Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" Is About Rape and Seven Other Songs You Misunderstood

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Robin_Thicke_Blurred_Lines_Rape.jpg
Robin Thicke is making a ton of money off his collaboration with Pharrell and T.I. titled "Blurred Lines," but have you ever bothered to consider what that song is about?

Well, the more we think about it, the more we think he's talking about date rape. "Just let me liberate you," Thicke coos, as if some woman telling him "no" isn't really what she wants. He knows you want it, so why are you fighting him?

That, added with the fact that the music video is completely misogynist, objectifying naked women while fully-clothed men walk around a bunch of balloons that tell us Thicke has a big dick. It's no wonder the Daily Beast, Wall Street Journal, and more were outraged enough to write whole editorials on rape culture and our totally "Blurred Lines" of acceptance.

But this isn't really a new issue. America is always falling in love with songs without ever having an idea what they're about. Don't believe us? See if you knew what these other seven songs were about all along. We'll bet a couple will surprise you.

See also:
-Rick Ross's Lame Apology for Molly Sex Assault Song: "I Don't Condone Rape #BOSS"

Nine Inch Nails' "Head Like a Hole"
Everyone seems to think this is the ultimate ode to sado-masochistic relationships, but if you listen to the lyrics, you start to wonder how anyone came to that conclusion at all. "God money, I'll do anything for you ... God money, let's go dancing on the backs of the bruised ... No, you can't take that away from me." This song is about corporate greed, so get your mind out of the gutter.


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41 comments
funpaguy000
funpaguy000

Oh, I'm not offended by Blurred Lines... it sucks. And I don't listen. But women who like it are hypocrites. That much is for damn certain.

Zsa Zsa Nogueira
Zsa Zsa Nogueira

"coos, as if some woman telling him "no" isn't really what she wants. He knows you want it, so why are you fighting him?" For some insecure women, this is true. Men can think whatever they want about that. That doesn't mean rape. Rape goes beyond what the guy is THINKING and into action. There is an almost naked girl in the video because men think its hot. There are a million other videos like it, so why pick on this one? Seriously. When the writer says its about rape ill change the station when it comes on. In the meantime, if someone is truly offended, I suggest they find a worthy cause that helps real rape victims and put their energies there where it will really make a difference.

Jeannie Necessary
Jeannie Necessary

It's not like this is new. The Beatles, "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" is a pop song with dark, eccentric lyrics about a man named Maxwell who commits murder with a hammer, but it has such an uplifting beat.

Rebecca Amster
Rebecca Amster

Blurred Lines is one of the most misogynistic and offensive songs I've heard in a while. It got ZERO playtime in my home and car this summer.

Patrice Russian
Patrice Russian

lol Bebe .. don't know if that's true but it made me giggle

Louis Wing
Louis Wing

I'm not sure.. but I think it's odd you're writing this...and the banner ad above the article is for their show on the beach

Julio Vega
Julio Vega

Alma now u have a real reason to dislike this song, and u never liked it from the beginning

underlab
underlab

The song is more about Adultery rather than Date Rape. The character Robin Thicke describes seems to have a Boyfriend/Husband and the entire song is on the Premise of men trying to steal another guys girl. The "Blurred Lines" refer to the analysis that the although the girl is NOT SINGLE is constantly flirting and seemingly DTF. Read Lyrics people.


Jason M Snelson
Jason M Snelson

C'mon-I think that someone interpreting Blurred Lines that way says more about the interpreter than it does about the song.

Anthonyvop1
Anthonyvop1 topcommenter

Only a man-hating, bitch would think that Blurred Lines is promoting rape.   

Seriously.  You are probably so negative that no man ever tried to seduce her.

So I suggest that the author, Kat Bein, Put on some make-up and a dress, drop the hipster "Kat" name and call herself Kathleen, learn to cook and maybe a man will show her some attention.

ptozen
ptozen

Kat,

NIN - HLAH is tricky.  I'm inclined to say that you're right, but more particularly that it's a statement about the greedy nature of the recording industry.  Reznor didn't have gripes against business itself, he was a janitor working at a studio and didn't exactly have a worldly view.  He was, however, a drunk who saw the music industry inside and out.

There are two things we know about NIN: 

Early NIN is synonymous smut and BDSM.  The early PHM and Broken music videos have been wrapped in controversy.  There's the banned music video for Sin that shows Reznor sharing a joint with a gay porn actor wrapped in leather and taking rides in a sphere.  Then there's the slasher-smut video for Down In It, which was lost and found and became the focus of an FBI murder investigaiton.  His follow-up album, Broken, is a a banned 20 minute long slasher-smut video that was immediately banned.  The opening track, Pinion, features a urinal whose pipes lead to the mouth of a gimp wrapped in tight leather struggling to escape. Reznor was a follower of the Chicago industrial metal scene, whose calling card was smut, violence, gore and anything subversive.  See Soft Cell (Sex Dwarf), Ministry, Pigface, Prick, KMFDM, etc.

Reznor hates the recording industry.  He's quoted several times saying as much, starting with his contract with TVT records.  Reznor's relationship with TVT records ended less than amicably.  They were restrictive about what and how he could record, and with whom, and his royalties;  to this day he still does't have the rights to PHM.  His angry follow-up Broken was recorded in secret with Interscope and tells the story of the music insdustry and his breakup with TVT.  There was a lot of pressure to release singles for PHM And package a lot of club remixes with each singles made by inside DJs.  HLAH was written under label pressure to release a single, and it was written quickly in 10 minutes.

PHM was also a drunk venture.  The early demo tapes for PHM, called Purest Feelings, showcases a very, very drunk Reznor playing the Saxophone, and the biggest singles were missing.  Something I Can Never Have, Sin, and Head Like a Hole were not recorded for the record, and Down In It was titled Ringfinger and featured as the outro track, whereas it's the third track (the album hook) on PHM.  Was SICNH, Sin and HLAH recorded as a result of label pressure?  Was it recorded in response to label pressure?  Is it an angry narrative of the pressure itself? 

<3, Peter

Valeria Vanni-Godoy
Valeria Vanni-Godoy

Maybe it's about a virgin that doesn't want to give it up although she wants it... "Let me liberate you"...

Turo Olvera
Turo Olvera

we tend to overthink things at times but when it is blatantly said it's overlooked

LaWanda Ogunsade Eiland
LaWanda Ogunsade Eiland

I knew the Foster the People song was about youth violence- but yes- we do over think things

Dan Marino
Dan Marino

Did you hire Alex Jones to write for New Times?

Sono Mataumo
Sono Mataumo

so true, good point all around... besides being a total ripoff --a lo descarao-- of Marvin Gaye´s "got to give it up", with better funk and respectful lyrics about the whole givinITup suggestion... As long as you're groovin' / There's always a chance...

erikace
erikace

thinking too much about the Blurred Lines song smh :/

FatHand
FatHand

Ha, never knew that about The Big Three Killed My Baby. Perhaps that is why in Jack & Meg's scene in Coffee and Cigarettes it's mostly Jack playing around with a Tesla coil.

Madison_Miller
Madison_Miller

@Zsa Zsa Nogueira The people criticizing this song are trying to help rape victims in their own way. Not only could rape victims could find the song's lyrics to be triggering, but it's media like this that perpetuates rape culture and distorts men's perception of what rape really is.

Madison_Miller
Madison_Miller

@underlab But he seems to also be disputing the girl's insistence that she doesn't want to have sex with him. Sometimes single women use the excuse of a boyfriend to fend off unwanted attention from men because it's the only way they can get them to back off.

funpaguy000
funpaguy000

@niero Do you even know what "slander" means... the song is rapey. Deal with it...and buy a legal dictionary, enabler!

FatHand
FatHand

@Anthonyvop1 And you call yourself a feminist...SMH

Anthonyvop1
Anthonyvop1 topcommenter

@ptozen  

Yea,  They hate the record industry.........But they really love those checks!


Old marketing ploy,.  "Down with Business,.  Down with Corporations"

Rage Against the Machine sold millions of records using that trick. 

ptozen
ptozen

@Anthonyvop1 @ptozen I don't think you understand the story behind Nine Inch Nails or the industrial scene.  Reznor has been embroiled in lawsuits with TVT and Interscope for 25 years, and meanwhile the Industrial movement  is by definition cutting agains the mainstream grain and marked by its underground culturally subversion association and commercially-unappealing grating soundscapes. Ministry and NIN were accidentally the best commercial successes.  NIN followed up its commercial success by doing 'whatever the fuck it wanted to it,' which obviously was to not sell albums by taking a five year hiatus with a 2-disc-long ballad to alcohol. 

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