Daniel Fiorda's "Nostalgic Hardware" Brings Techno-Fossil Art to Wynwood

Categories: Art
DANIEL FIORDA SHIFT TO GOLD NOSTALGIC SERIES 2011edited.jpg
Daniel Fiorda, Shift to Gold 2011
Courtesy of Lelia Mordoch Galerie
Miami sculptor, Daniel Fiorda has often played the role of urban archeologist in his oeuvre. He has used everything from racing boat pistons, to the metal guts of discarded convertible couches to increasingly obsolete technology in his expansive series of works.

He has created menacing robot warriors, soaring totems, alien insects that appear fugitives from an H. R, Giger nightmare, and futuristic dragsters straight out of Blade Runner. The self-taught Argentine artist's sculptures are inventive and infused with an insatiably experimental sensibility.

"Nostalgic Hardware," Fiorda's current show at Lelia Mordoch Galerie in Wynwood combines a decade of the artist's works and features a variety of media spanning from sculpture, to found objects, paintings, and works in progress.

We live in a consumerist society where we no longer form attachments with possessions," Fiorda says. "Technology is evolving so rapidly that yesterday's typewriter, sewing machine, VCR's now even cell phones and computers commonly end up in the trash. I know people who own three Ipods. What do they care about an object they can easy discard and replace," Fiorda observes. "Even the Space Shuttle, is getting grounded and sent off to gather dust in an aerospace museum somewhere," the artist laughs.

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Daniel Fiorda, Embryo 2003, Detail
Courtesy of Lelia Mordoch Galerie

For years Fiorda has combed through junkyards along the Miami River sifting metal parts to solder into sculptures that looked like mutant creatures or microcosmic compressions of a universe imploding on itself.

In the past the artist would employ industrial detritus, using fragments of automobiles, screws, copper sheeting, twisted steel, aluminum and iron, even the entrails of a rotting piano to rework with his torch and hammer into a unique anthropomorphic vision from a world where machines would eventually turn on man.

DANIEL FIORDA BLACK EVOLUTION 2001 2007edited.jpg
Daniel Fiorda, Evolution 2001
Courtesy of Lelia Mordoch Galerie

Fiorda's earlier works appeared crushed by unseen magnetic forces and seemed to reflect an overarching concern of humanity's negligent stewardship of the planet and its resources, hinting at some post-apocalyptic gloom.

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Daniel Fiorda, Without Her, 2010, Detail
Courtesy of Lelia Mordoch Galerie
Yet lately the artist has adopted a more purist approach in his new works and has been presenting items such as typewriters, cell phones and sewing machines that convey a notion of editing as intrinsically sculptural artifacts rather than being savaged by the artist's hand. Some of these remind one of relics from a fading era, "readymade fossils from pre-digital times," Fiorda says.

"In the past I would have to walk through heaps of trash in salvage yards for hours on end to discover a piece of metal I could use in a work. Now days you can go to the Salvation Army and readily find boxes and boxes of old electronics and stuff". Fiorda says that friends also dump their electronic discards at his studio for him to use while pointing to a rows upon rows of old-fangled Underwood typewriters on a table outside his studio baking under the sun.

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Daniel Fiorda, Mustang Blue, 2011
Courtesy of Lelia Mordoch Galerie
"It's nuts, someone actually gave me a 1930's radio microphone and a Remington typewriter that's almost 100 years old. I'm keeping those for my collection," he cracks.

On view at Lelia Mordoch, who also represents Fiorda in her eponymous Paris gallery, you'll see his rescued gadgets given fresh splashes of brightly glowing hues--exuding a near Pop Art sensibility---and presented against glossy black panels as trophies from long gone times.

Fiorda's faux archeological treasures speak to the fossilization of our household icons, with the artist inserting them not unlike insects frozen in amber to remind us of the blurring velocity from which today's coveted possessions and contemporary hardware can vanish into obsolescence with a blink of the eye.

See "Nostalgic Hardware" through May 7 at Lelia Mordoch Gallery (2300 N. Miami Ave., Miami). Call 786-413-1506 or visit galerieleliamordoch.com.

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Lelia Mordoch Galerie

2300 N. Miami Ave., Miami, FL

Category: General

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Katia
Katia

Katia Danilova Narciso : Congratulations, Daniel, great article and amazing work! Thank you for sharing.

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