Free Events This Week in Miami: Symphonies, Food Trucks, and the Perfect Tailgate

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Photo by Max Reed
The weekend was a blur, and now, time begins marching ever so slowly. Not to worry, there are plenty of feel-good freebies to get you through the work week.

Maybe you had a big pig out session and you need some friendly workout encouragement. Maybe you didn't get to eat enough, and you want to learn how to cook up the perfect tailgate. Or maybe you just want to curl up with a good book.

Miami's got all that and more at no cost to you. C'mon, Monday, get excited.

See also: $5 Yoga Classes Offered In Wynwood's Warehouse Project

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Free Events This Week in Miami: Everglades Art, Salsa History, and Mid-Week Treats

Categories: Art, Books, Culture

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The world only gets one Everglades. Let's appreciate it whenever possible.
III Points is over. Did you make it out alive?

Even if you weren't taking part in the massive Wynwood music, art, and technology fest, chances are you went and spent a load of cash trying to forget the work week behind you. The trouble is, another one is in full-swing, and that cash is still gone.

Not to worry, there are ways to distract yourself without mula. Here are a few of our suggestions.

See also: III Points 2014 at Soho Studios, Day Two

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Five Ways to Reinvent the Miami-Dade Public Library System

Categories: Books, Opinion

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Photo by Alex Markow
It's going to take more than these to fix up the Miami-Dade Public Library system.
We here at Cultist looooooove libraries, but we'd be lying if we said we stepped foot in one more than once in the past year. Because we are learned, we can identify that as a problem.

We're not really alone. Of the 2,496,435 people in Miami-Dade, only 1,084,841 are registered. Not too long ago, there was talk of cutting the Miami-Dade County Public Library system budget, but overwhelming support from voters like you for something so drastic as tax hikes to keep the system running smoothly have changed the discussion from cutting back to total rehaul.

The Knights and Miami Foundations held a special panel discussion and conference luncheon on Monday to see how other cities have successfully revamped their libraries into the digital age, and it got us thinking. How could the Miami-Dade Public Library System improve? Here are some of our ideas.

See also: Library Advocates Say Gimenez Budget Would Slash Services For Miamians

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Free Events in Miami This Week: Carl Hiaasen, Sketchy Galleries, and Swamp Art

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Photo by Giulio Sciorio
The official DWNTWN Art Days have come to an end, but that doesn't mean the well of creativity is dry. Miami's galleries continue to open their doors to art lovers looking for interesting perspectives on the world around them, and a lot of those doors don't come with cover charge.

If you find yourself feeling sluggish in the midst of a new work week, spice up your life with some of these free exhibits and activities. At no cost to you, supporting the local arts has never been easier.

See also: Cuba Out of Cuba: "Keeping It Alive For Future Generations"

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Books & Books To Open New Location at Arsht Center

Categories: Books, Literary

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It's a great time to be a book lover in South Florida. Popular literary destination Books & Books will once again expand its reach when it opens another location in the former Sears Tower on the campus of the Adrienne Arsht Center.

The new location, set to open by the end of the year, will house a café open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner daily with seating for about 100, the Miami Herald reports. The Arsht Center spot is the latest addition to the Books & Books family, which includes outposts in Coral Gables, Miami Beach, and Bal Harbour.

See also: Miami Book Fair International Brings National Book Award Winners, Finalists to Miami

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Yoga Guru Cyndi Lee on a Simple Way to Stop Hating Our Bodies

Categories: Books, Lifestyle

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Courtesy of Cyndi Lee
Elizabeth Gilbert and Cyndi Lee
As a renowned yoga teacher and media darling, Cyndi Lee seemed like the poster child for confidence and self-acceptance. Yogis are supposed to be radiant avatars, after all. But beneath the Namastes and Lululemon she was hating her body, just like (most of) the rest of us.

This realization led her on a lengthy journey -- to India, to Japan in the midst of the 2011 earthquake, to interviewing notable women, to finally embracing a loving kindness practice that shifted her perspective. She penned the book, May I Be Happy, about her experience, and she's speaking about it at Books & Books on September 18. We spoke to Lee on self-loathing, new perspectives and how she's accepted the wrinkles on her knees.

See also: Where to Find Free Yoga Every Day of the Week

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Exile Books Pop-Up Premieres Saturday at Locust Projects

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Photo by Augusto Mendoza
Amanda Keeley has always found inspiration in artist's books. Now, the 2014 Knights Art Challenge finalist is readying her longtime project, Exile Books, for its Miami debut this weekend at Locust Projects. Exile Books is a traveling pop-up store installation dedicated to selling, supporting, and promoting publications produced by artists.

For the premiere pop-up, Keeley collaborated with New York painter Sarah Crowner, who has created a large installation that references the history of stage and set design, with Keeley sourcing materials about set design, theater, and dance performance for the location. The opening reception on Saturday also will feature the limited-edition monoprint of a theatrical playbill, created by Keeley and Crowner, that will be available for purchase. Books that inspired Crowner, like periodicals from the Art Brut movement, will be part of Exile's selection, in addition to three titles by the artist.

See also: Knights Arts Challenge Finalist Amanda Keeley Plans to Stage Pop-up Bookstores

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Trans Advocate Jazz Jennings To Appear at Books & Books

Categories: Books, LGBT

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Courtesy Jeanette Jennings
Jazz Jennings
TERFs (or trans exclusionary radical feminists) are men and women that do not consider male-to-female transexual women as victims of patriarchal society as biological women, and therefore excluded from the feminist struggle for sociopolitical equality. It's a mouthful, but it points to an important cleave that's receiving more and more public attention.

Marginalization of transexuals within the queer community is not new. For years mainstream gay lobbying groups have myopically overlooked the transexual community in pursuit of political gains for non-transitioning queers. Yet, with more transexuals coming into the public eye, America is taking a second look at this once passed-over minority.

See also: Drag #Out at Gramps Is Gender-Bending Fun for Gays and Straights Alike

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Fall Movie Preview: Seven Best Book-to-Screen Flicks

Categories: Books, Film and TV

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Ben Rothstein and Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Dylan O'Brien stars in the popular book-to-screen adaptation, The Maze Runner, this fall
Summer is often associated with a boom in big-budget film releases -- plenty of movie choices to satisfy those lazy, hot days. When school's out, the superhero, action-heavy flicks come out swinging. And when the wind starts to cool, the movies with a little more heft and brains graze the silver screens.

In short, fall is when the good stuff hits theaters.

See also: Venice Film Festival: Al Pacino Re-Discovers His Inside Voice

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Reading Queer: Poet L. Lamar Wilson on the Struggle to Love God, and Each Other, Freely

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Courtesy José A. Villar-Portela
On Saturday, Miami's first gay literary festival, Reading Queer, hosted its headlining event at the Miami Beach Botanical Garden, where poet and scholar L. Lamar Wilson read selections from his award-winning collection of poems, Sacrilegion. A Marianna, Fla. native, Wilson's poems have appeared in African American Review, Callaloo, jubilat, Los Angeles Review, The 100 Best African American Poems, and other publications.

The event opened with words from founder of the series, Neil de la Flor, the director Jose A. Villar-Portella, as well as Wilson on how he came to be involved in the series. Upon discovering Wilson, they fell in love with his voice and reached out to ask if he would consider headlining the series, with a "perfect ensemble of voices," says Villar-Portella.

See also: Reading Queer: Literary Festival Explores '80s Gay Cruising Culture

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