Seth Meyers Proves He's a Fearless Comedian: Eleven of His Best Jokes

Categories: Comedy, Review

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Seth Meyers is one funny dude. You don't need to watch NBC's Late Night or even have to know his previous work on Saturday Night Live, where he spent 13 years as head writer, to enjoy a night with him. You do, however, need to get a kick out of politically incorrect jokes, which were pretty much large portion of his show this past Friday at the Fillmore Miami Beach.

The fearless Meyers started by calling President Obama an angry lame duck only to counterbalance with, "You realize he's not going to just spend the last two years locked up in his room. He is not the princess from Frozen. "

See also: Seth Meyers on Stefon, Cosby Jokes, and Talking With His Hands: "Try to Keep It Under Wraps"

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Seth Meyers on Stefon, Cosby Jokes, and Talking With His Hands: "Try to Keep It Under Wraps"

Categories: Comedy

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Courtesy of NBC Universal
When Seth Meyers was tapped to take over Late Night, it wasn't that surprising.

Already a year into the gig, and Meyers has been able to set himself apart from his predecessors Jimmy Fallon, Conan O'Brien, and David Letterman, by injecting his own brand of witty humor into Late Night. He owes a lot of his success to his time on Saturday Night Live, where in addition to anchoring Weekend Update, he was head writer during a period that saw the late-night sketch show produce several comedy superstars like Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Bill Hader, Kristen Wiig, Jason Sudeikis, Fred Armisen, and more.

New Times spoke to Meyers, who is performing at the Fillmore Miami Beach tonight, January 23, about his transition into Late Night, his relationship with Stefon, and Bill Cosby jokes.

See also: The Ten Best Comedy Acts in Miami in 2015

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The Ten Best Comedy Acts in Miami in 2015

Categories: Comedy

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Photo via Seth Meyers

If you're looking to get your funny bone tickled, then 2015 is going to be a good year. This year the Magic City plays host to some marquee comics from mainstream, observational comics like Jerry Seinfeld and Seth Meyers to improv groups like The Groundlings and Second City and funny ladies Whitney Cummings and Kathy Griffin. Here are our picks for the year:

See also: Mandy Baca, Author of Discovering Vintage Miami, Talks About the Past


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Comedian Steve Berke Punks Art Basel, Sells Fake Art

As if you needed more proof that many Art Basel attendees know little about art. Miami-Dade native, Miami Beach mayorial candidate, and comedian Steve Berke conducted a "social experiment" during Miami Art Week to see if he could go from zero to "artist" in less than 24 hours and sell one of his works.

Berke has already had his hand in pro-tennis, politics, and reality TV, so why not make another, albeit fake, career move? With stencils, small square canvases, and spray paint, Berke produced 100 canvases in about an hour, then snuck into Art Basel Miami Beach at the Convention Center.

See also: Steve Berke: Comedian for Miami Beach mayor

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Comedian Tom Rhodes Is on His Way Everywhere

Categories: Comedy

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Courtesy of Tom Rhodes
No comedian has done it like Tom Rhodes. After proving himself as a top tier American club comic, life and love took Tom elsewhere. He established a fierce international presence and for decades maintained relevance in both spheres. He is simultaneously both relaxed and hungry to conquer. He's sharp, newly-sober, and luckily for New Times Tom Rhodes is from Florida (or he might be in Hong Kong).

See also: Nery Saenz: Killer Comic

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Nery Saenz: Killer Comic

Categories: Comedy

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Photo by Stian Roenning
"All my co-workers said, 'You should do standup, you should do standup,'" Nery Saenz remembers.
In this week's Miami New Times, we profile 30 of the most interesting characters in town, with portraits of each from photographer Stian Roenning. See the entire Miami New Times People Issue here.

Nery Saenz is a funny guy. Everybody around him can sense it. In fact, his friends and co-workers have been predicting his success in standup comedy for more than a decade.

The problem was that Saenz couldn't see it himself.

"All my co-workers said, 'You should do standup, you should do standup,'" Saenz remembers. "But I always just kind of brushed it off." After all, Eddie Murphy, Saenz's comedy idol, had begun his career at the age of 16. Saenz, then 22, figured he'd missed his chance.
But at the urging of a fellow comic, Saenz signed up for a standup competition in 2003. When he finally took the stage, he killed.


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Mike Birbiglia Gets Personal at the Arsht: "I've Been On This Path of DIY"

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Photo by Evan Sung
Mike Birbiglia is a joke. No, really.

He's better known as a comedian, actor, screenwriter, author, and performer, of course. But when he steps onstage next Thursday at the Arsht Center's Knight Concert Hall, he says, he wants the audience to laugh not only with him but also at him.

"Early in my career, [my comedy] was just doing ruminations," Birbiglia tells New Times. "I was really just doing what I saw other people doing, tonally." He started out modeling himself after his deadpan comedy heroes, Mitch Hedberg and Steven Wright.
But bit by bit, he began to insert more of himself into his act. "I was like, what if I make myself the joke?"

See also: TruTV's Impractical Jokers Hit Miami: "We Basically Take Turns To Embarrass Each Other"


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TruTV's Impractical Jokers Hit Miami: "We Basically Take Turns To Embarrass Each Other"

Categories: Comedy

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Some say laughter is the safest alternative to tears, while others say it has the power to keep sickness at bay. But really, laughing is just fun and it's most fun when you get to laugh at someone who's totally OK with you doing so.

Take Joe Gatto, for instance, a Staten Island native who discovered at an early age that making people laugh is not only something rewarding, but can also save him from a beating or two from bullies. His passion for comedy both saved him from the unwanted wedgies and swirlies as a kid, but also proved to be quite worthwhile later in life.

After college, Gatto formed a comedy troupe with his old high school buddies Brian "Q" Quinn, James "Murr" Murray, and Sal Vulcano, called The Tenderloins. Fast forward a few years and the foursome have their very own prank comedy show on truTV, Impractical Jokers.

The pork-loving troupe will be in town Wednesday night to open their tour and we chatted with Gatto about his comedy, why talking to adult in a baby voice never works, and, of course, Miami.

See also: Kate Chastain and Kat Held of Bravo's Below Deck Talk Yacht Life and Crazy Passengers

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Wynwood Salon Junior & Hatter Celebrates Two-Year Anniversary

Categories: Comedy, Lifestyle

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Photo by Junior & Hatter
III Points kicks off today, and shit in Wynwood is about to get all sorts of weird. But the three-day festival, boasting a gnarly lineup of artists, isn't the only place to get-down at this weekend.

This Saturday, Wynwood's savior of hair care, Junior & Hatter, is hosting a feted shindig to celebrate their 2nd Anniversary of staying afloat in a neighborhood that has claimed the lives of many businesses -- both young and old.

See also: Art and Journalism Meet in Andy Gallacher's Show at Junior & Hatter

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Steve Martin and Martin Short: 13 of the Duo's Best Comedy Bits

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Trying to name all the funny moments that occurred in Steve Martin and Martin Short's self-described "Very Stupid Conversation" is kind of like trying to count all the grains of sand in the Sahara. Frankly, there are too many to mention.

Even before the two comedy legends took the stage at Hard Rock Live at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino this past weekend, a montage of the duo's funniest moments from Saturday Night Live and their numerous films and television appearances affirmed the fact that Martin and Short may be the funniest comedy team since Rowan and Martin or Martin and Lewis.

Snarky, sharp, cynical and self-effacing, they began by sizing up the crowd and surmising that while the venue appeared sold out, "It's we who have sold out. If we had saved up, we wouldn't be here."

See also: Remembering Robin Williams in The Birdcage

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