Miami Vice: 30 Years of Crockett, Tubbs, and Pastels

On September 16, 1984, two dreamy gelled-up cops came to our rescue. Detectives Sonny Crockett and Ricardo Tubbs, members of Metro-Dade Police vice squad, vowed to rid Miami of its criminal ills, taking on pimps, cokeheads, and mob bosses with bad ass moves and bad pastel suits.

Today marks the 30th anniversary of Miami Vice, the NBC '80s hit that made Don Johnson a superstar (once upon a time) and forever cemented Miami as the capital of neon, kick ass cars, and bromance. Who didn't want to be besties with Crockett, living on a sailboat guarded by his alligator, Elvis? Good times.

Rightfully so, the Internet is happily traveling down memory lane. Here's a collection of
some righteous pics from some Vice forever fans.


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DWNTWN Art Days Kickoff Features Exhibits, Short Films, and Food Trucks

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Courtesy of McCormick Place
The arts are alive and well in downtown Miami. What's that, you say? Hasn't Wynwood already assured that fact? Hasn't Art Basel proven that Miami's already become a center of the art universe? Yes, and yes, but in this case we're talking specifically about that other "downtown," the one that encompasses Brickell and the commercial hub of those concrete canyons.

Credit McCormick Place, a onetime warehouse repurposed as a haven for artists, events and exhibitions, and the Downtown Development Authority with the upcoming launch of the Miami Downtown Arts District -- conveniently known as MDAD -- an extensive initiative that will combine support for museums, galleries, artists, art studios and various cultural institutions with participating businesses, live venues, hotels, and restaurants, all in an effort to promote art, culture and historical preservation throughout downtown and Brickell. The proposed boundaries for the district will be YoungArts on Biscayne Boulevard and 21st Street to the north, I-95 to the west, 26th Road to the South, and Biscayne Bay to the East.

See also: DWNTWN Art Days: Fringe Projects' Public Installations and Frost's New Maker Space

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Que Cute: How To Spot a Miamian During New York Fashion Week

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The Miami woman is a rare commodity, a wonder to behold. And when something summons their illustriously loud presence to another far-off land, taking them out of their natural habitat, that certain je ne sais quoi shines all the brighter, especially in the heavily condensed hustle and bustle of New York City, and especially during New York Fashion Week.

While trekking from show to show during the semi-annual roundup of designers, we couldn't help but notice some irrefutable differences between the Miami fashion ambassador, and the contemporary likes of her hunched-back counterpart, the City girl.

Here's how you sniff out Miami's finest from everyone else at NYFW. Observe.

See also: The Five Most Miami Collections at New York Fashion Week

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DWNTWN Art Days: Fringe Projects' Public Installations and Frost's New Maker Space

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Courtesy of Fringe Projects
Conceptual work by Domingo Castillo.
Downtown Miami will become a living canvas during the third annual DWNTWN Art Days. The event, developed by the Miami Downtown Development Authority (Miami DDA), brings together Miami's cultural venues with artists from Miami and around the world to celebrate the city's vibrant love affair with visual art.

Sonja Bogensperger, team leader of business development, real estate, and marketing for Miami Downtown Development Authority, and Claire Breukel, the creative director of DWNTWN Art Days, say that the weekend-long event was developed from a desire to showcase the area's growing art community.

See also: André Mehmari: Mixing Classical Music and Improvisation at DWNTWN Art Days

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Floatopia 2014: Miami to Take Massive Ice Bucket Challenge on the Beach

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Photo by Laura Morcate
Gather your air pumps and red Solo cups, Miami. It's time for another Floatopia, the bi-annual celebration of beach, bikinis, and fun floats that make us all feel like boys and girls again.

This year's float fest at South Pointe Park has been challenged to take the ALS ice bucket challenge by the original Floatopia in Virginia Beach. A cringe-inducing task on the regular, Floatopia's event has hot sun, cool ocean, and BYOB booze to soften that freezing blow.

"I think (Miami) is a great venue because it's pretty, the water is right there," the event's organizer said. "At 3:05 p.m., everyone will grab a bucket, bring abuela's bucket, or your nephew's bucket -- hopefully I'll be able to provide the ice -- and we'll all do the ice bucket challenge."

See also: Floatopia Returns to South Beach! Top Five Tips for Successful Floating

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Sofia Vergara's Emmys Skit Proves We Need More Positive Representation of Latinas on TV

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There has been a lot of talk, Tweets, and Instagrams since Beyonce's powerhouse performance at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday and Sofia Vergara's spinning skit at the Emmys Monday night. The stark contrast between the two showings has caused a stir, with "feminism" and "sexist" hashtag-storming social media.

But let's bring it back home for a second: Vergara wasn't trying to make some feminist statement with her bit at the Emmys, instead she was just flaunting her assets at the request of the chairman of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Bruce Rosenblum. "What truly matters," Rosenblum said while Vergara rotated on a pedestal, "is that we never forget that our success is based on always giving the viewer something compelling to watch."

See also: Chef Filming in Miami: Behind the Scenes with Sofia Vergara, John Leguizamo

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Ifé-Ilé Afro-Cuban Dance Festival Returns to Miami

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Photo by Nelson Alvarez
"I've got one foot in Miami and one foot in the Caribbean," says Neri Torres, the founder and director of the Ifé-Ilé Dance Company, which will host its 16th annual Ifé-Ilé Afro-Cuban Dance Festival from Thursday, August 28, through Saturday, August 30. This is true for her culturally, as a Cuban artist living in Miami who is intent on keeping Cuban traditions alive on foreign shores. She also lives part-time in the Caribbean, as a lecturer in dance at the University of the West Indies. But she considers Miami home.

As a teacher, performer and choreographer, Torres has brought high-quality dance and performance to the Miami community year after year through the Ifé-Ilé festival. We recently spoke with her about this year's festival -- taking place for the first time in Little Havana -- and her future creative direction.

See also: Copperbridge Foundation Brings Cuban Artists to Miami Stages

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Photographer Richard Sexton Coming to Miami to Discuss Latest Work, Creole World

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Courtesy of the Historic New Orleans Collection
Street scene near the Marché de Fer; Cap Haitien, Haiti, 2012; ©Richard Sexton, from "Creole World: Photography of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere"
The concept of "Creole" is far more complex than most people who only had a passing interest in their 8th grade history courses might recognize. To most Miamians, it's a language spoken in Haiti and among the burgeoning Haitian population of the city. That's far too much of a simplification, even if you only want to look at Creole languages, which are defined in one Wikipedia line as "a stable, full-fledged language that originated from a mixture of two or more languages." And while that's a simplification as well, it should give you a sense of the greater scope of culture and people that the term "Creole" encompasses.

From the island of Haiti, to the parishes of New Orleans, to the mountainous villages of the Central American isthmus, the roots and tendrils of Creole identity in the Americas and the Caribbean have been growing and becoming more and more a part of their respective home cultures.

That process and the results thereof have been of great interest to Richard Sexton, a photographer and resident of New Orleans for almost 25 years, whose most recent work is called Creole World: Photographs of New Orleans and the Latin Caribbean Sphere. Saturday night, he'll give a reading at Books and Books in Coral Gables. New Times sat down and got acquainted with Sexton in order to get you acquainted with Sexton.

See also: Little Haiti Country Club Brings Community to Growing Art Scene, Won't Last Forever

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Miami Jazz and Film Society Presents Free Screening of Trayvon Martin Case Documentary

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Images courtesy Sherry Suttles
A painting about the Martin case as shown by Cindy Philemon, assistant for the Goldsboro Museum. Philemon explains that the red in the painting represents Trayvon Martin's blood.
The world has had its attention on Ferguson, Mo., and the shooting death case of Michael Brown, a young, unarmed black man who was killed by police officer Darren Wilson.

Because of the nature of the case, it's only natural that many would think back to the shooting of Trayvon Martin, the young black man, also unarmed, who was killed in his father's Sanford, Fla., neighborhood by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. A documentary analyzing the first days of the investigation into Martin's death, 44 Daze, will give those interested in the Martin case and the epidemic of unarmed black men killed in the U.S., more insight when it's screened for attendees at the Miami Jazz and Film Society's Weekly Film Screenings event this September.

See also: Trayvon Martin's Mom to Michael Brown's Parents: "We Will No Longer Be Ignored"

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Kendallsuyo Book Seeks to Spotlight Miami's Overlooked Andean Roots

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Courtesy Américo Mendoza-Mori
The "Lady of Coracora" Celebration, a traditional festivity that originated in Ayacucho (Southern Andes).
In the wake of the Pamela Druckerman fiasco, it's pretty clear that lots of folks (even former residents) still harbor stereotypes about Miami.

University of Miami Ph.D. candidate Americo Mendoza-Mori thinks that even the city's Latin culture tends to overlook crucial aspects of its own identity. One aspect includes the unique segment of immigrants who originated from Peru and the Andes, eventually forming the Kendallsuyo settlement in Southwest Miami.

To get the word out, he's launched a Kickstarter to support his book project -- a tome focused on the fascinating stories of this singular group and how they've helped shape Miami as a whole.

See also: Miami Book Fair: Daniel Alarcón Recounts His Drive Into the Dark Heart of Peru's Drugland

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