Meet the Surge, Miami's Newest Sports Team

Categories: Sports

surge-3.jpg
Courtesy of the Surge
When it comes to sports, we're no New York. In the MLB, we're a joke; the NFL an afterthought; the NBA, well ... who knows what we'll be without our golden boy.

But now, we've got the potential to come out on top a brand new sport: "strategic team athletics racing" (a.k.a. grid). Miami is one of only eight cities in the National Pro Grid League (NPGL), a brand-spankin' new endeavor that pits co-ed, musclebound teams of athletes against each other in a series of weightlifting and body weight challenges (think gymnastics moves and heavy-weighted maneuvers).

See also: The Seven Worst Betrayals in Miami Sports History

More »

The Five Best Sneaker Boutiques in Miami

Categories: Fashion, Lists

IMG_8770.jpg
Photos by Nycole Sariol
When it comes to the latest and greatest in menswear coming off of Paris and Rome's runways, the average Miami dude just doesn't get it, nor does he give two shits. But when it comes to the very touchy subject of their kicks, however, Miami men could school the best of them -- that means you, NYC and LA; yeah, we just called you out.

It all started in 1984 when Nike and His Airness, Michael Jordan, revolted against NBA standards and splashed a bold, Chicago Bulls colorway of red and black onto what everyone knows now as the first pair of Air Jordan 1. Thirty years later, and the game has expanded exponentially with the acquisition of mega stars on and off the court, collaborating with billion dollar accounts to constantly pop out rain-makers like Yeezy's Air 2 Red Octobers (still), and the continuance of the perpetually sold-out Air Jordan dynasty (#forevershallyourule).

The sneakerhead subculture got so huge in fact that people started making a lucrative income just by collecting and selling these "wearable memorabilia."

But it seems Miami's sneak-scene in particular has violently peaked as of late, not just for the fellas, but for their equally fly boo-thangs, as well. Some say LeBron is to blame for the sudden spike of footwear flow in Miami; others concede that it's just a general desire to express individualism. But the real question, of course, lies in where to retrieve the freshest pair of kicks around town.

See also: Del Toro Shoes Takes It to the Streets with Artist Johnny Robles

More »

Summertime Art Geniuses: Painter Enrique Machado's Deeply Textured Waters

Categories: Art

enriquemachadoCrashedited.jpg
Courtesy of Enrique Machado
Crash
As a teenager, Enrique Machado was captivated by the tactile nature of water. "At the time, I was attending New World School of the Arts and started making these ice sculptures of people that I would hollow out and place a light source inside," the 28-year-old Miami native recollects. "I was interested in working with concepts relating to the transfer of energy."

After graduating from the Kansas City Art Institute with a degree in sculpture, Machado found a job working in the art department at the Miami Lighthouse for the Blind in Little Havana, where he taught visually impaired adults and children arts and crafts.

See also: Summertime Art Geniuses: The "Hidden Magical Worlds" of Jose Tonito

More »

Reading Queer: Literary Festival Explores '80s Gay Cruising Culture

Categories: LGBT, Literary

Munoz_CruisingUtopia.jpg
Courtesy of Reading Queer via Facebook
This week in South Beach, artists and guests will take part in an interactive artistic and philosophical expression in the Reading Queer Series, which aims to inaugurate Miami as a center of queer literary culture.

The series kicked off at the Betsy Hotel in South Beach last Saturday, and continues with the artist group Digital Hostage Collective's Cruising Hialeah or Ghosts of Public Sex tonight from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Miami Beach Botanical Gardens.

See also: Former Miami Herald Reporter Reveals Gay Escapade in Havana

More »

Summertime Art Geniuses: The "Hidden Magical Worlds" of Jose Tonito

Categories: Art

tonitoPandemiainrededited.jpg
Courtesy Jose Tonito
Pandemia in red, 2014
It's August and the galleries are mostly closed or operating on short hours. The big-name artists have hightailed it for cooler climes. So how to get your art fix? Try these three off-the-beaten-path geniuses.

In the lavishly landscaped yard behind his Hialeah home, Jose Tonito waves his arms like a symphony conductor while Cuban music plays in the background.

As the plaintive guitar wail sweetens the air, the 53-year-old artist fans colored ink across photo paper. Now and again his fingers skip across the surface to highlight patterns within the emerging forms.

Tonito, who was born in Havana in 1961, moved to Hialeah with his family in 1978 and studied photography at Miami-Dade Community College. After graduating with a BFA from Florida International University, he went on to a long career as a fine art photographer who also shot artworks at local galleries and museums for many years.

See also: Miami Artist AholSniffsGlue Sues American Eagle Outfitters for Intellectual Property Infringement

More »

Flamenco Festival's Celia Fonta: "Flamenco 'Alante' is an Endangered Art"

Categories: Dance, Festivals

celiasoloedited.jpg
Courtesy Celia Fonta
Siempre Flamenco, a Miami based Flamenco arts organization, is widely recognized in town for the quality of the festivals they have presented. The organization was founded by the husband and wife team of Paco and Celia Fonta -- he is a Flamenco guitarist and singer; she is a Flamenco dancer. Their individual performances as well as their classes have won the organization even more support.

We talked to Celia Fonta about their upcoming festival, which starts weekend at the Arsht Center for the Performing Arts.

See also: Ifé-Ilé Afro-Cuban Dance Festival Returns to Miami

More »

Sofia Vergara's Emmys Skit Proves We Need More Positive Representation of Latinas on TV

Thumbnail image for Sophia_spins_Emmys.jpg
There has been a lot of talk, Tweets, and Instagrams since Beyonce's powerhouse performance at the MTV Video Music Awards on Sunday and Sofia Vergara's spinning skit at the Emmys Monday night. The stark contrast between the two showings has caused a stir, with "feminism" and "sexist" hashtag-storming social media.

But let's bring it back home for a second: Vergara wasn't trying to make some feminist statement with her bit at the Emmys, instead she was just flaunting her assets at the request of the chairman of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, Bruce Rosenblum. "What truly matters," Rosenblum said while Vergara rotated on a pedestal, "is that we never forget that our success is based on always giving the viewer something compelling to watch."

See also: Chef Filming in Miami: Behind the Scenes with Sofia Vergara, John Leguizamo

More »

Phone Dad: A Discussion on Fathers and Familiarity in the Art World

Categories: Around Town, Art

pdatop.jpg
"Phone Dad was born of a desire to expand the standard art conversation a bit and expand it to [hopefully] do two things: make it more participatory, and draw in insights that [are] a bit outside of the fairly well-worn talking points that art talks often fall into." Cara Despain's roundtable discussion at Locust Projects this Thursday is the psychological staple of female adolescence when little princesses cease to be and become independent women.

Her discussion is a litmus test for where we generations divide us. Fathers have always been "squares." For all the oil changes, doll-house construction, and beating up on no-good boyfriends, there will always exist the questionable fashion choices, inability to function with certain technologies, and the befuddlement of halter tops.

Fathers will remain eternally unhip.

See also: Become a Mermaid at Locust Projects' Maritime-Themed Living Photo Booth

More »

Help Name Jungle Island's New Baby Mini Zebu and Capuchin Monkey

Categories: Animals, Giveaways

Minaturezebuedited.jpg
Photos courtesy Rachel Pinzur
This lovely lass needs a name!
Thank you, Jungle Island, for endorphin-boosting work distractions.

To celebrate its upcoming Neighbor Days special this weekend, Jungle Island invites the public to help name two newborn cuties: a capuchin monkey and a miniature zebu.

See also: Vulcan the Liger Is Back Home at Jungle Island

More »

Podcast: Why Did So Few People See Sin City 2?

Categories: Film and TV

jessica-alba-sin-city-2.jpg
Very few people saw this movie.
Why did so few people see Sin City: A Dame to Kill For over the weekend? That and other topics are discussed in this week's edition of the Voice Film Club podcast with the Village Voice's Alan Scherstuhl and Stephanie Zacharek, joined as always by Amy Nicholson of the L.A. Weekly via the magic of the Internet.

The trio also discusses the latest YA adaptation If I Stay, the BDSM doc Kink, and they wrap with Alan and Amy split on relationship movie The One I Love, starring Elizabeth Moss and Mark Duplass.

Now Trending

Miami Concert Tickets

From the Vault

 

Clubs

Loading...