Dead Drivers: Four Shootings This Year Raise Questions About Miami-Dade Police Protocol

Categories: Crime
Charles William Collins.jpg
Florida Corrections
Charles William Collins was killed last month after allegedly using his car as a weapon against police
Charles William Collins was a career drug dealer and petty thief. Miami-Dade police knew as much when two undercover cops followed him into a bright-yellow pawnshop on NW Seventh Avenue in Liberty City on August 14. They pulled out their badges and asked him for ID. Collins said he left it in his car.

But when Collins stepped inside the stolen Volkswagen hatchback, he threw the vehicle in reverse and hit the gas. An officer opened fire, killing Collins. Collins didn't have a gun, but an MDPD spokeswoman said the shooting was justified because he had turned his car into a deadly weapon.

That excuse is beginning to wear a bit thin. Four of 17 shootings by MDPD this year have involved officers opening fire on someone armed with only a car, raising questions about whether cops are ignoring protocol and provoking shootings.

Collins' killing was only the latest in a string of such shootings. Just three months earlier cops shot and killed suspected jewelry thief Orestes Fernandez when he, too, allegedly tried to run over an officer.

Because all four cases remain open, the department declined to provide incident reports, and a spokesman declined to comment. If we get a response from MDPD, we will update here.

The frequency of such shootings raises questions about whether cops are breaking protocol by putting themselves in harm's way.

"Their policy prohibits using deadly force to stop fleeing felons," says one officer from another local police force, who asked that his name not be used. "These are just people trying to get away, but they end up paying a much heavier price for it."

"It's a training issue," he says, suggesting that MDPD officers are being taught to step in front of cars to give them a reason to fire. "It makes me afraid to get in the car, honestly, for fear of what they'll do to me at a traffic stop."

But Dade County Police Benevolent Association president John Rivera insists his officers are acting in self-defense.

"At the end of the day, we are all spectators," he told Channel 10 after the Collins shooting. "Those police officers are in the middle of the arena. If they feel in danger... they have to take action."

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11 comments
Nuris Rosado-Diaz
Nuris Rosado-Diaz

I love the Miami Police......The streets Be A Police In Miami,.....God Bless The Miami Police.

James Nall
James Nall

Or, maybe the cops aim is getting better! As far as I'm concerned, if a criminal tries to get away, the cops SHOULD be able to open fire. Who knows what innocent person could be harmed by some idiot driving like a maniac down the streets of Miami trying to evade capture.

James Nall
James Nall

Or, maybe the cops aim is getting better! As far as I'm concerned, if a criminal tries to get away, the cops SHOULD be able to open fire. Who knows what innocent person could be harmed by some idiot driving like a maniac down the streets of Miami trying to evade capture.

Absurd
Absurd

Fuck the police, the south beach shooting incident on nig-weekend aka urban weekend was unprovoked and ridiculously dangerous. But hey, what else can be the outcome of a bunch of reprobates with self-esteem issues carrying weapons with immunity to the very laws they are enforcing... Let me reiterate, FUCK THE POLICE.

Taylor Hardy
Taylor Hardy

We are not there when that person trys to run you down and take your life. Why flee from the police if you have done nothing wrong?

Taylor Hardy
Taylor Hardy

We are not there when that person trys to run you down and take your life. Why flee from the police if you have done nothing wrong?

Justifiable
Justifiable

Definitely some interesting points, but the line "armed with just a car" makes it sound like it's a banana or something. If a dude/ette is coming at you in a car, you fire. If you aren't in front of the car, but step in front of said car (giant cajones, meng) to stop it and dude/ette doesn't oblige - you fire. Either way the criminal is at fault. The only circumstance that isn't right is if they shoot him/her in the back.

HarryTheHandyman
HarryTheHandyman

Awesome.  Less criminals clogging up prisons and overburdened courts.

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