Drownings Rise in Miami Beach as Lifeguards Demand More Resources

Categories: News

Miami_Beach_lifeguard_tower_Ianare_Sevi.jpg
Ianaré Sévi via Wikimedia Commons
Dillon Charles peered out the window of the Fontainebleau and finally saw sunshine. For three days, rain had threatened to ruin his summer vacation. Soon he would have to head back to Brooklyn to his wife, six kids, and a backbreaking construction job. But not yet.

Charles stripped down to his swim shorts and sloshed into the Atlantic with a female friend. The water rose to their chests and then to their necks. Suddenly, the sand gave way under their feet and they could feel themselves being sucked away from shore.

A wave crashed on their heads. Charles swallowed the sea. Despite being born on the Caribbean island of Grenada, he wasn't much of a swimmer. Now it felt as if he were inside a giant washing machine.

"Help!" his friend screamed, struggling to keep her head above the surface. "Help us!"

A rip current tugged at their ankles. Waves slapped their faces. Salt water forced its way into their mouths, their noses, their lungs.

When assistance arrived minutes later, it wasn't Miami Beach lifeguards but Fontainebleau cabana boys. It was also too late. As the woman hacked up water, she could hear sirens in the distance. Charles lay motionless on the sand next to her.

"There were no lifeguards," says the woman, who asked not to be named but whose story is confirmed by police reports. "I had to yell so much to get the attention of [the cabana boys]. I think they thought I was playing. But when people are thrashing around in the wa- ter, they're not playing. They're drowning."

The June 6, 2012 incident was never reported in the news. In fact, few drownings ever make headlines in Miami Beach, where tourism drives the economy. But there is an ugly truth beneath the sparkling surface of this tropical paradise. Every year, people die on these idyllic shores. With drownings on the rise, according to numbers compiled by New Times, some lifeguards say a lack of resources and employees is to blame.

Lifeguards point out that as the number of visitors to Miami Beach has soared over the past decade, the number of lifeguards has remained static. Despite record resort tax revenues, lifeguards complain they lack basic lifesaving equipment. And instead of adding watchtowers to areas that need them -- such as the beach in front of the Fontainebleau -- the city is considering additional cuts.

"People are dying because politicians don't want to spend money on public safety," says one lifeguard, who asked not to be named for fear of losing his job. "But the public has no idea what is really happening."

Ocean Rescue officials deny politics are putting people at risk, and argue some deaths are simply unavoidable.

"Could we have more [lifeguards]? Sure, that would be a great thing," says operations supervisor Scott Reynolds. "Is it the reason for any of the fatalities that have happened? No, that has nothing to do with it. It has to do with rip currents, preexisting medical conditions, and alcohol."

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11 comments
Ÿänn Hidalgō
Ÿänn Hidalgō

It's easy to spend money... I can do that... Vote for me!

sinbadsailor99
sinbadsailor99

What is the average pay for these government union lifeguards? Why is that not mentioned in the story? My guess is that they are being paid an outrageous amount, perhaps as much as six figures. I like the idea of replacing them with part-time or private lifeguards who will work harder with less whining.

MiamiBeachCrack
MiamiBeachCrack

Easy to fix.  Just test the sand for fecal matter.  Publish the results.  Nobody will go to the beach anymore.  Miami Beach is a union city.  A city run for city employees is not a city.  It's a business. 

Patricia L Watt
Patricia L Watt

Bacteria will kill us all on the Miami Beach Century long sludge on the Shit Strip. Not just old plumbing on the beach, but the cruse ships. Happy conjunctivitis. Watch out for those little shite oval plastic left overs from the disintegrated panty liners. They come in waves before the green water, like the man o war.

Bryan Selent
Bryan Selent

Really? If only common sense was actually common, then we wouldn't need lifeguards. However it's not, and people can get drunk at Wet Willies and stumble the 100 yards across the street into the water and drown. I say give them the resources they need to save peoples lives, we all know the City of Miami Beach can afford it

Johnny2
Johnny2

 The problem is the lifeguards are now under the fire department union mafia. Do what other areas have done and hire independent life guarding companies. Heck, even John Stossel had a segment on this very issue.... Twice the bang for the buck to go independent and no more political BS with the fire department.


http://www.schooltube.com/video/42e994a52cdd1c28c485/

Christian Wells
Christian Wells

I would actually prefer fewer lifeguards; In my experience, they're usually a bunch of eye-rolling smartasses who assume you can't swim, treat you with condescension, and try to block you from going into the water if there are even mid-sized waves. I'm a Florida native, and I could literally swim before I could walk. I understand the water and I consider myself a good swimmer. If you're down here on "vay-kay" from New York and you don't have a clue what you're doing, stick to splashing around in your hotel's swimming pool. Don't go into the ocean if you know you can't swim.

EzƦă VɅǹ
EzƦă VɅǹ

In Galveston, TX the lifeguards were being overwhelmed by problems on the beaches with increased crowds so they gave them guns.

Tu Madre
Tu Madre

And yet they still always manage to look bored...

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