New York Times' Latest Drive-by of Miami Is Classist Trash

Categories: Media Watch

ayikondasdancers.jpg
The Ayikodans dance troupe performs to a sold-out crowd at the Arsht Center.
What exactly does Miami need to do to confirm it's a culturally competent city? It seems as if the Big Orange is always going above and beyond to prove itself, yet it's never enough.

Pamela Druckerman, a Miami native who moved away after high school to do things like collect Ivy League degrees and write books extolling the virtues of French parenting, took to the New York Times this weekend to announce that Miami isn't quite there yet. Why? Well, simply because the Magic City wasn't providing her with "enough surprising interactions and ideas."

Yes, apparently the bar for cultural relevance is now set at making sure blond ladies who went to Columbia University have pleasant chitchat while they're staying here.

See also: New York Times Writer Discovers Fisher Island Is Almost As Horrible As She Is

Druckerman's essay is stunningly inept, if not downright classist. She asks questions she never bothers to answer, like wondering if Miami has a soul or if maybe the problem isn't so much Miami but her. (Though the answer to that one seems pretty clear.)

She spends most of the essay prattling on about how she didn't quite find the Miami of her youth compatible with the "life of the mind" she so wanted.

"The upper-class Cubans who became Miami's new aristocracy had little trouble adapting to the city's materialistic ethos," she writes. "After all, they had been forced to leave all their stuff in Cuba. Soon there were two dominant modes of conversation in Miami: discussions about where to get your hair done, and anti-Castro rants."

The complaint comes off as if she's almost saying, "Yes, yes, I'm sorry a brutal communist dictator took over your country and you were forced to leave everything you've ever known and loved behind to start over in a foreign country, but doesn't anyone want to discuss the influence of French New Wave cinema on Hollywood movies of the '70s?"

Now married with three kids and living in Paris, Druckerman finds herself visiting Miami in the summertime every year to catch up with family and, as she repeatedly points out, enjoy the Miami weather (which as we all know is not particularly pleasant in the summer, but whatever). This leads her to a series of asinine thoughts.

Perhaps this one is the worst:

Most locals also don't seem bothered that Miami is one of America's most unequal cities, with lots of very poor people living close to rich ones. Miami's have-nots are easy to ignore, since -- if they're not cleaning your house or parking your car -- you just drive past them.

Well, Pamela, statistically "most locals" are the victims of that inequality, and yes, we do seem quite bothered. We wonder why local leaders allow the building of luxury high-rises -- where no one actually intends to live -- that displace actual locals and drive up housing prices throughout the county. We're baffled as to why the county can find money to give corporate welfare to sports teams but can't seem to keep our libraries open. We want jobs with livable salaries, good schools for our children, and reliable public transportation. Miamians are very much bothered by the city's inequality every single day of our lives.

See also: Miami Rents Are Wildly Unaffordable for Average Residents

Yet Druckerman really shows her ignorance with her "if they're not cleaning your house" line. She seems completely unaware that perhaps people who can't afford regular cleaning service and valet parking would read her little what-I-vaguely-thought-about-my-summer-vacation report, let alone the people who actually clean those homes and park those cars.

She comes across like those idiots on ESPN who demonize all Miami Heat fans simply because the rich few who can afford courtside seats during the playoffs don't show up to the game on time. She bases her impression of the city on those who either have money or abuse credit cards to pretend they do and live shallow, charmed little lives. No one is denying that type of person is prevalent in Miami, but it's certainly not all the Magic City has to offer. Yet Druckerman seems unaware, because, well, she just drove right past them.

And while there are some thinkers scattered around town, Miami is overrun with lawyers, jewelry designers, and personal trainers, all trying to sell services to one another.

Wow, she means to tell us there are people in this city who possess skills to offer services that are in demand and actively try to get others to pay for those services? Do people not do that in Paris? Is New York not overrun with investment bankers, image consultants, and professional pet psychics? And who says lawyers, jewelry designers, and personal trainers are distinct from "thinkers" anyway?

See also: Miamians Can't Afford to Buy Condos in Miami

What's odd is that Druckerman never actually spells out what she did with her time in Miami aside from swimming laps and returning her rental car. Did she simply sit by a pool all day, or did she bother to do things like catch an independent film at O Cinema, Miami Beach Cinematheque, Coral Gables Art Cinema, Cosford Cinema, or Tower Theater? Did she check out any Wynwood galleries or one of the several art museums? (How many do we even have at the moment, actually?) Did she attend a reading at Books & Books? Drop by the Arsht Center? She seems vaguely aware there are "thinkers scattered around town," but did she even try to find them? It's like visiting New York, spending most of your time in Times Square, and concluding that the Big Apple has no intellectual heft.

She concludes:

I struggled to have conversations that weren't about real estate or consumption. There was a lot of pleasure in Miami, but not enough surprising interactions and ideas. Miami may one day be the city for normal-looking people with semi-intellectual aspirations and a mild social conscience. But it's not there yet.

Those "normal-looking people with semi-intellectual aspirations and a mild social conscience" exist in droves in Miami. We're also smart enough to know how this city works and that the vast majority of tourists who visit are looking to have a good time and not to exchange observations about Foucault and have conversations peppered with bons mots. Most tourists only really care to ask us where the best restaurants, clubs, and blow are, so excuse us for not greeting everyone like they've arrived at a Parisian salon.

Miami's cultural and intellectual capital is growing (to list all the festivals, programs, and institutions that have popped up in the past decade at this point almost seems insulting). Look at the other major American cities that only really established themselves as such after World War II (think Las Vegas and Orlando); then look at where Miami is.

Miamians are having important discussions about our future and our economy. We're exchanging surprising ideas and interactions. But we're doing it for ourselves, not snooty people who visit for two weeks a year and don't even consider housekeepers worthy of interaction.

Follow Miami New Times on Facebook and Twitter @MiamiNewTimes.

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95 comments
frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

.............THAT'S SO MIAMI 


A divided Miami Beach Historical Preservation Board voted this morning to approve a controversial plan to convert a local church courtyard into a glitzy clothing store.In a 4-3 vote, the board reaffirmed its May 13 decision to allow the Miami Beach Community Church to lease its historic, 94-year-old courtyard on Lincoln Road to a prominent South Beach hotel developer.The request to reconsider the plan was filed by the Miami Design Preservation League. After this morning's defeat, MDPL said it planned to continue fighting against the decision.See also: Miami Beach Community Church Controversy: Developer Donated $500,000 Before Key Vote Led by developer David Edelstein, TriStar Capital plans to turn the churchyard into a sleek glass and steel clothing store (rumored to be either an Abercrombie & Fitch or an Old Navy) much like other recent buildings on Lincoln Road.


A WORLD CLASS CITY ? HUH ?

Steve Vose
Steve Vose

Miami has no appeal for those who have chosen to take jobs here independent of geography (e.g. college professor). It's an intellectual wasteland. Worse, the people here are so uncivil, rude, and blatantly consumerist. It's marzipan.

MatthewH
MatthewH

Eh, I moved to Miami for law school... and have stuck around for 3 years after graduating and I agree with Druckerman. I've been to all of the places mentioned in this rebuttal, but honestly, Miami doesn't live up to any other city I've lived in on an intellectual level. I see a lot of people being defensive about the NYT article, but it's true. For anyone who has been immersed in another major American city on the east coast, Miami doesn't measure up on a deeper level. 


I have a love/hate relationship with Miami. And not to turn it into a racial thing, but as a young black male, I've never been treated worse or with less respect than I have in Miami over the past 6 years. And obviously, there are wonderful, intelligent and thoughtful people here (I believe you'll find them everywhere), but I will say that it has been a struggle finding those people on any sort of regular basis in Miami. It's home for me and I make the best of it on a daily basis, but as a city, *we* can do much better. 


(oh, and outside of the U, the sports fandom is *terrible* in Miami... and I judge true fandom by how people react when the teams aren't performing well). 


And before panties are bunched, if the negatives don't apply to you, then they're not about you and you have no reason to be angry. 

Anon
Anon

Let's get a couple of things straight. She didn't go to Columbia College (the undergraduate school at Columbia University). She went to Colgate. Very good school, but it's far from Ivy League, and the only reason a snob like this lady would go to Colgate over Columbia is that she didn't get into Columbia.

She went to graduate school at Columbia to get a master's in "international affairs," a field populated by would-be diplomats and those who don't need to make a living with their graduate degrees. This is a grad school that is probably far easier to get into, in terms of percentage of applicants admitted, than Columbia College; or, for example, Columbia Law, despite her opinion of lawyers.

So don't be so impressed by her academic credentials. Academically, this is a mommy-and-daddy-rich second-rater. Admire her achievements in journalism.

jlizzotte
jlizzotte

In her piece, Druckerman claims to be a "third generation Miamian". For all of Miami's sophistication and short falls, Miami is still a small town in that it's hard to go too many places and not run into folks you know or folks who know folks you know. Add third generation Miamian to the pool and the town gets even smaller. 

C'mon guys, who knows this woman? Who went to high school with her?  Was she that shallow and vapid back then? I guess she was if at 12 her ideal was to marry a plastic surgeon but there's probably lots of other amusing anecdotes floating around out there about Ms. Druckerman before she "put Miami behind" her and "tried to have a life of the mind" (she even got a graduate degree, unheard of in this backwater!!!).  Was there any indication that it was even possible for her to purse "a life of the mind" back in high school?  We had the same classroom experience during Mariel except she was in the sixth grade and I was in the second so I put her at around 46 or so, graduating high school in 1985 or 86.  I have a hazy memory of someone named Judy Druckerman who was heavily involved the the City of Miami Opera or Ballet. Does anyone else? Get those yearbooks out people!

As a second generation Miamian who's great grandparents came here in the 1920's, I'm kinda stunned that Druckerman is sooooo disconnected from this city and it's history. My great grandparents and Druckerman's were pioneers.  You had to be a little bit nuts to make the trip south from whatever relatively civilized place you called home to set up shop in what was essentially a trading post on a swamp.  You had to have a dream and believe you had a purpose.  I know Miami eats it's own.  You can't get to the second syllable in "his-tor-y" before Miami swallows another landmark whole and burps up a new high rise or strip mall.  But how can she come from such people and be so ignorant of the unique ethnic, racial, socio-economic and yes, even intellectual life of this city? Fine, if Miami isn't your cup of tea!  But good lord, have some respect for where you came from, even if you apparently had to struggle to rise above the circumstances of your birth to become the elitist snob you've become!

WhyNotNow
WhyNotNow topcommenter

If anyone (Fred Grimm over at the herald did it) spends a few minutes reading what else Druckerman, the failed Miamian, wrote you would see she is all Miami. The woman bought and participated in a ménage a trois for her husband for chrissake. She is all Miami and obviously can not come to terms with her roots. Not unusual for insecure people to attack their roots. Who cares anyway?

Almita García
Almita García

The poor woman! Who knows what her "circle" was like! Let her go back to her adored city and get her fingers frozen, while we enjoy our Miami many layers of bliss and reality!

fpoj
fpoj

Kyle, I am sorry to say, even at the cost of hurting your pride, that she is spot on with Miami. I have lived here for 7years now, and I have been coming here since 1978 on a regular basis. Other than foreign street artists painting derelict buildings in Wynwood while the neighbors stay poor, Miami remains a culturally flat town.

Whoever thinks Miami is culturally competent hasn't been to NY, Barcelona, London, Chicago, Paris, Rome, Boston, Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Milan, Tokyo, DC, Vienna...and it goes on.

With all the money landing in this town...how come there is not a single world class museum? How many days a year you have the choice of a live concert of classical music, opera, jazz, blues, chamber music? How many serious theater plays can you choose from? And this one KILLS me...how many bookstores can you name putting together Miami, Miami Beach, Sunny Isles, North Miami, Aventura, etc, etc.???

It is time for Miami to own up to the fact that all the Bentleys, Ferraris, and Porsche condominiums on Collins or Brickell are not enough substance to call yourself a world class city.

Sarahi Menendez
Sarahi Menendez

Why compare Miami to NY?? They are completely different cities, different weather, different people...I have traveled the world and I will always come back to my lovely Miami. When you mention Miami in the most remote places in the world they think we live in paradise, only some ignorants insist in critize... Let them waste their energy, it is what it is...and getting better

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

take a visitor or guest or tourist to NYC and they get around fine - take that same person here to MIAMI and they get lost and have no one to ask = period

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

........................otherwise IF you are the BEST in the WORLD at what you do, whatever that is, then NYC is the place for you, whereas in MIAMI you wouldn't even be noticed = period = it's just the way it is 

donthatemiami
donthatemiami

At least in Miami, you don't have police choking an unarmed man with a heart problem to death (New York). 


Most of the comments against Miami are pretty obnoxious along with her entire article. If you feel so negative about the city and you moved out, it means you didn't want to improve it and took the easy way out, and you can stay out. 

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

..................well,  maybe SOMEDAY soon,  every foreigner will go home and give MIAMI back to AMERICA, and then we can "compare", otherwise MIAMI and NYC are so different, yet each has it's own "value", the basic reality is NEITHER is a place to raise kids (unless of course you are super-rich)





frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

..................basically MIAMI will only join AMERICA when it speaks ENGLISH


i don't suggest this in a mean-spirited way only that the language issue is real and the whole ENGLISH speaking country has basically the same opinion


what is PRIDE of their original country to spanish-only speaking MIAMIans is seen as rude or ignorance or lack of respect to AMERICA as a whole = period


without proper assimilation there will always be a divide however defined by AMERICA

Jorge Fernandez
Jorge Fernandez

It was a bit short in substance but, as a former Miamian, who also lived in New York for 13 years, she was absolutely correct in her characterization of the city. The New Times constantly tries to measure Miami up against NYC. You just can't. Please just stop and be happy being yourself.

pod_nt
pod_nt topcommenter

News flash - people who come here often take great pleasure in comparing their hometowns to us, for some reason. 


First off, Miami is barely over a century old. New York, and her beloved Paris are much, much older. 


Secondly, why all this clamoring to make Miami like New York? If you want New York, go to New York. Part of what makes this world fun is that each community is, well, different. If Miami had the same art and culture as New York, why would we want to go to New York? 


Miami has it's problems, sure, but we're not doing too bad for a city that's barely existed a century, and was nearly destroyed (major hurricanes) a few times. 


New York isn't off the hook either - taxation and the nanny state mentality are it's biggest negatives. 

Jarrod Gillen
Jarrod Gillen

Everyone I know that has moved to NY has 1. Either moved back to where they came from or 2. Trying to move back to where they came from. Also every person I know from New York 1. Love living in Miami and 2. Are never moving back to NY. And 3. Talk crap about Miami everyday. I personally have lived here all my life and of course I have a "Love/Hate" (No pun intended) relationship with Miami. I choose to use constructive criticism when it comes to talking about the place I choose to live. I mean, at the end of the day how do you think you (not you particularly you but maybe you \U0001f609) look talking bad about the place you choose to live your life. Looks pretty ignorant to me.

Lorena Miranda Bendeck
Lorena Miranda Bendeck

I couldn't agree more with her. Have you ever taken the metro in Miami. Total chusmeria, meanwhile, in places like DC and Boston, people have their noses buried in books or a newspaper. I love this city for what it is and what it can be. Keeping my hope alive...

Joel Guerra
Joel Guerra

Iove the article but unfortunately I have to agree with Druckerman.

786_til_i_die
786_til_i_die

BREAKING: City with worst adult functional illiteracy rate in the US outraged at former resident's claim that, while it is moving in the right direction, it is not yet a bastion of intellectualism.

UMHurricane01
UMHurricane01

For some reason, I doubt most will read Druckerman's actual article before commenting...so here it is:


MIAMI — IF you had asked me what I wanted when I was 12 years old, I probably would have said, “to marry a plastic surgeon.”

You can hardly blame me: I was growing up in Miami. My life plan elegantly combined the city’s worship of bodies and money, and its indifference to how you came by either. When I left for college, I put Miami behind me, and tried to have a life of the mind. I got a graduate degree. I traveled. I even married a fellow writer, whose only real estate was a dingy one-bedroom apartment in Paris, where we lived.

But with kids came long summer pilgrimages to Miami to see family. It took a lot of effort to keep spurning the city, especially since the weather was so good. Miami had grown up a bit, and so had I. Hadn’t it developed a soul beneath its vapid, extremely pleasant, slightly menacing exterior? If I understood Miami better, could I grow to like it? Maybe I was the problem?

Like practically everyone who grew up in Miami, I knew little about its history. We were more worried about mangoes falling on our cars. It took just a bit of reading to realize that Florida had always attracted people with “an inordinate desire to get rich quickly with a minimum of physical effort,” as the economist John Kenneth Galbraith once described them.

And if the Miami of my childhood had the temperament of a spoiled teenager, that’s because, effectively, it was one. The city was founded in 1896, but for its first 60 years or so it was a segregated backwater, with fewer than a million people. (Despite the occasional celebrity sighting, “There was nothing, not even a Neiman Marcus,” someone who lived there in the 1950s told me).

The 1959 Cuban revolution was modern Miami’s unofficial birthday. Over the next 20 years, practically the entire Cuban upper class arrived. Many other Cubans followed. One of my neighbors in the 1970s had been imprisoned by Fidel Castro’s government. Another was doing his best to overthrow it. After the 1980 Mariel boatlift, which brought 125,000 more Cubans to Florida, surprised-looking children who spoke no English suddenly appeared in my sixth-grade class. Colombians, Nicaraguans and others arrived later.

The upper-class Cubans who became Miami’s new aristocracy had little trouble adapting to the city’s materialistic ethos. After all, they had been forced to leave all their stuff in Cuba. Soon there were two dominant modes of conversation in Miami: discussions about where to get your hair done, and anti-Castro rants.

In recent summers, I’ve found that Miami isn’t that city anymore. Young Latinos — no longer burdened with the myth that they’ll one day return “home” — adore their American hometown. They major in Spanish literature at Florida universities, gush about Miami’s weather, and get sentimental about stone crabs, Cuban coffee and buying avocados out of the trunks of cars.

The area’s remaining “Anglos” — now just 15 percent of the population — want their kids to learn Spanish. (Confusingly, Miami’s Latinos call these Anglos “Americans.”)

Continue reading the main story

MIAMI even has a homegrown dialect. Young Latinos — regardless of whether they even know Spanish — speak English with a Spanish twang. To non-Miamians, they sound like extremely fluent immigrants. Phillip M. Carter, a linguist at Florida International University, says that when young born-and-bred Miamians visit the rest of America, or even Boca Raton, people often ask them what country they’re from.

“Miami English” is also proof that a city can be international but not cosmopolitan. People typically don’t realize they’re speaking a dialect unless they leave Miami, Mr. Carter says.

Most locals also don’t seem bothered that Miami is one of America’s most unequal cities, with lots of very poor people living close to rich ones. Miami’s have-nots are easy to ignore, since — if they’re not cleaning your house or parking your car — you just drive past them.

Still, Miami has gotten more interesting, just by existing a while longer. Its buzzing new arts scene is a start. “I think Miami is now trying to figure out a way to be a center of ideas and brains,” the urban-studies theorist Richard Florida told me.

For the moment, though, Miami looks like a giant construction project. After a several-year lull that started in 2008, luxury condominiums are shooting up again, often right next to each other. The local economy still runs on selling bits of land to newcomers.

And while there are some thinkers scattered around town, Miami is overrun with lawyers, jewelry designers and personal trainers, all trying to sell services to one another. “Injured on a cruise ship?” reads a sign on South Dixie Highway, one of the city’s main thoroughfares. My recent stay coincided with Miami Spa Month, a bathing-suit fashion week, and a “camming” convention for stars of do-it-yourself pornography. While dropping off my rental car, I met a Central American woman who made extra cash picking up people at the airport and driving them to their appointments for cut-rate breast enlargements.


I wanted to fall for the place. I’m a third-generation Miamian. I’m fond of it. I’m an expatriate, so it’s the only American city I can still legitimately claim. Many of its faults — especially its inordinate interest in shopping — are my own too. And it’s obvious why people like it here. After two weeks, I’d swum so many laps that the flaps of fat on my arms, which I’d assumed were an inevitable consequence of middle age, were nearly gone.


But still, compared with the Miamians, I felt practically deformed. And I struggled to have conversations that weren’t about real estate or consumption. There was a lot of pleasure in Miami, but not enough surprising interactions and ideas. Miami may one day be the city for normal-looking people with semi-intellectual aspirations and a mild social conscience. But it’s not there yet.


Pamela Druckerman is a contributing opinion writer and the author of “Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting.”\

Charlene O. Conill
Charlene O. Conill

I agree completely! She must hang out with completely devoid Miamians because I have the pleasure of enjoying complex conversations about much more than hair and the weather.

james32937
james32937

 Do people who say, "Spot on" come from England or are they just looking for their doggy?  I see it on TV being said by the American Broadcasters and wonder, what's up man?  I come from South Phila and being Irish my parents figured I needed an Italian Godfather and that's what I have. So, I guess I'm intellectually diverse.  Why do people who talk bad about Miami ever bother unless is makes them feel intellectually better or as my South Phila training tells me, "Here's a dime, go call someone who give a shxx."

RoscoeParrish
RoscoeParrish

By the way, how incredible is it that Munzenreider publishes this incensed reply extolling Miami's virtues as a cultural and intellectual hotbed one week after his 3 page article analyzing the "Miami level" of Kim Kardashian's latest app.  Jorge Perez building a tax shelter in a shitty park doesn't make this a cultured city, and whatever gains we may have made in the past decade are offset on a daily basis by the blogs of the Miami New Times.  Bro. 

RoscoeParrish
RoscoeParrish

Ms. Druckerman's comments were pretty empty and I'm not sure why they drew such outrage.  The only point from the article or reply which bears repeating was hers in which she stated that Miami was international and yet not cosmopolitan.  Pretty spot on.  Bro. 

EzƦă VɅǹ
EzƦă VɅǹ

While in NY this is all the rage as they are so evolved and mature as not to hate outsiders...

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

......................YES however i have also met some quite nice and welcoming many poor and uneducated and certainly clannish


it IS an intellectual wasteland indeed on a scholarly level but studs terkel certainly would find all the street level "stories" worthy of some level of observation and study


stick with the basics in food and lifestyle and you may find some redeeming quality - remeber, when in ROME ................. - right ?

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@MatthewH


unfortunately much of the real sports attraction was killed when the ORANGE BOWL died - and stories connecting TEXAS and ALABAMA and JOE NAMATH and SUPER BOWLs to here were lost to the bulldozer (as well as the community spirit in hosting those with vehicles needing parking(i could leave my keys in the car and no give it a thought)) - and years before that sportsfishing for TARPON our of the biscayne yacht club was considered exotic


don't BLAME the local-yokel typically uneducated and poor for the M O N E Y grab of real estate developers who line the pockets of corrupt politicians and rape the landscape because those who flood the place with funds and party here don't VOTE here and could care less about the residents and those who do VOTE are overshadowed by corruption

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@Anon


that still doesn't mean she is WRONG on this issue

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@jlizzotte


she has the benefit of the TRENDs that have left scars on MIAMI over time - there is NO DOUBT the typical citizen of MIAMI is much worse off than back years ago especially when it comes to affordable housing and proper public education = period


the WATER system is about to collapse and the federal governement had to sue MIAMI-DADE to "promise" to dedicate sufficient funds to make the proper repairs and maintenance - THE WATER SYSTEM has been overlooked by politicians for years ! - THE WATER SYSTEM a basic and necessary public administrative RESPONSIBILITY !


that is what i think druckerman sees as absolute dereliction of public obligation 

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter


.............................but she may be CORRECT

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@fpoj ......................how does this happen ?


basically, residents here don't vote here ! 


tourists and snow-birds (or however one catagorizes part-year residents) PAY THE BILLs and are glad to be in 70 degree weather when it's freezing up NORTH - 


otherwise they just don't care who's MAYOR or sheriff / police chief  or county commissioner because from day one there has been corruption here 


- it's why terrorists plotted 9/11 from south florida 


- there is NO ADULT SUPERVISION

MIA-305tilidie
MIA-305tilidie

@frankd4 

There's plenty of America speaking English. Perchance you can find another region to move to?

By the way, the nonsense you wrote above about the NYC public education system is hogwash and false. Miami is a bilingual city. You 'claim' to know other cities, prove it. Find me another 'world class city' in the world outside of the United States that doesn't operate with 2 or 3 main languages.

Or we could just call a spade a spade and really get down to the brass tacks: You're a thinly veiled racist, bro.

 

donthatemiami
donthatemiami

Former? Then stay away instead of helping to improve the city to your vision. Coward. 

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@pod_nt


.......except for the SEMINOLE everyone here is from "somewhere else"

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@donthatemiami @frankd4


well they ALL learned ENGLISH and at least made an attempt to assimilate their own customs and traditions into AMERICANA - that sentiment is absent here in MIAMI


basically the NYC public education system and the NYC public transportation system makes it possible to bring oneself to fully participate in NYC,  whereas here in MIAMI both are realistically non-existent as our public schools are simply a joke and public transportation is nothing more than a shuttle for hobos miscreants and vagrants


take a visitor or guest or tourist to NYC and they get around fine - take that same person here to MIAMI and they get lost and have no one to ask = period

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@MIA-305tilidie @frankd4 "Find me another 'world class city' in the world outside of the United States that doesn't operate with 2 or 3 main languages."


MIAMI is not operating effectively because it is NOT a bi-lingual place


too many people speak ONLY spanish,  or only ENGLISH, and IF you read many travel brochures you will see they note this fact about MIAMI (these same brochures do NOT give such notice on "world class cities")


so it's NOT me saying this, it is travel and tourist industry standards


you're simply reading too many MIAMI real estate developers marketing and promotion junk and NOT authoritative and un-biased guides and studies of those who DO have the requisite knowledge to develop standards identifying "world class cities" = and MIAMI is not one of them because of its "limitations"


maybe you haven't heard the standard joke about what most eleswhere in the US like about MIAMI - "it's so close to AMERICA that it's easy to get to"

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@MIA-305tilidie @frankd4


as for languages NYC has 194 member state/countries in the UN and each has a delegation of people ALL of whom can be seen throughout NYC on ANY given day


i myself have typically heard as many as a dozen different languages within one block in NYC in midtown


BI-LINGUAL means speaking more than one language fluently - many in MIAMI speak ONLY spanish - they are NOT bi-lingual = period = so that does NOT make MIAMI bi-lingual


i lost count how many times someone will approach me in MIAMI and start speaking spanish, i don't, and they do not speak english, so it's a dis-connected encounter [and many many will tell you the same experience if you ask]


..........otherwise,  there is NO reason NOT to speak the HOST country language - AMERICA is the host country and ENGLISH is it's language = period

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@MIA-305tilidie @frankd4


i went through the NYC public school system so i know that first hand - NYC spends $25,ooo,ooo,ooo annually [According to data, New York spent $19,076 per student in the 2011 fiscal year, as compared to the national average of $10,560.So, with all this spending on students, does New York really offer a superior education? It may be so: Earlier this year Education Week ranked the state as having the third-best schools in the country.] [Miami-Dade County Public Schools District Profile• Number of students: 347,133 • Per pupil expenditures***: $8,190]


NYC spends MORE THAN 2 times what MIAMI-DADE spends PER CHILD PER YEAR !


DID YOU ever LISTEN to NPRs radio WLRN when the MIAMI school board meeting is broadcast live ?


ITS like comparing the NYYANKEES to the MARLINS


of course why argue the facts when you can just use the RACE CARD and start calling people names without even knowing them personally


MAYBE you just don't understand because YOU didn't get the education you were entitled to - too bad

bdawg317
bdawg317

@donthatemiami the defensiveness in comments like this and others is pretty telling. 


Stop calling people cowards - the same could be said of us and our parents for leaving their respective countries. 

pod_nt
pod_nt topcommenter

@frankd4 - If you want to get technical, even the Seminole came from somewhere else.

donthatemiami
donthatemiami

@frankd4 @donthatemiami because its so easy and cheap to build a subway in Miami or to tear up Kendall Drive for a east/west metro route. 


The city wasn't planned well in its initial sprawl and now they are doing what they can to enhance it. The new Trolly system is great and not full of bums like you state. Step by step it will get better. So, instead of bashing it like this chick, how about take steps to make it better. 

frankd4
frankd4 topcommenter

@donthatemiami @frankd4


it's too late - too much corruption


i'm not bashing because i can speak from real experience as a hometown resident


MIAMI is simply mis-managed and this will continue because M O N E Y flows to the wrong pockets here


in NYC bloomberg was the wealthiest NYC resident as MAYOR so basically not corruptible = period


here in MIAMI the developers own the place and therefor care less about residents than they do profits and the corrupt politicians ALLOW it

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