How Miami Chefs Celebrate Thanksgiving at Home

Categories: Holidays

ericksonandgrandma.jpg
Courtesy of Todd Erickson
Young chef Todd Erickson and his Grandma making cranberry sauce.
Thanksgiving is tomorrow and, for most of us, that conjures up a dinner table filled with turkey, mashed potatoes, string beans, and pumpkin pie.

But, with the United States (and Miami), being a gigantic melting pot of cultures, what really constitutes a Thanksgiving dinner? The New York Times recently posted a map that listed the most popular and unique holiday dish in every state. The findings were as diverse as our country. Florida's was flan de calabaza, while New York's side of choice was the stuffed artichoke. Be thankful you don't live in Utah where the macabre-sounding funeral potatoes are a hit or Nevada's frog eye salad, which combines pasta salad with coconut, pineapple, Mandarin oranges, and marshmallows. (Here's a recipe, if you're curious.)

We asked some of Miami's favorite chefs to weigh in on what's on their family tables. From a traditional meal to a vegan spread, here are our favorites.

See also: Chef Peter Vauthy's Ultimate Turkey Tips For Thanksgiving Success

More »

Chef Peter Vauthy's Ultimate Turkey Tips For Thanksgiving Success

Categories: Holidays

petervauthy_turkeytwo.jpg
Laine Doss
Behold! The perfect turkey.
Thanksgiving is tomorrow and you're probably getting ready to pick up your turkey. Before you lay one finger on that bird, let Red the Steakhouse's Peter Vauthy show you how to get the most from your turkey.

What, you say? A steakhouse chef who talks turkey? Let's just put it this way. At a recent Friendsgiving dinner at the SoFi restaurant, chef Vauthy served a turkey that was so moist, so tender, it blew everyone at the dinner away.

So, in the interest of sharing for the holidays, chef Vauthy has shared his tips for roasting the absolute perfect turkey -- complete with his amazingly easy brine recipe.

More »

Ten Best Wynwood Restaurants

Categories: Best of Miami

derekpies_torres.JPG
Photo by Carla Torres
Food is everywhere in Wynwood.
There's no denying it: Wynwood is becoming a food mecca.

Turn back the clock a decade, though, and there was virtually nowhere to grab a bite besides Enriqueta's. Joey's changed that in 2008, when Tony Goldman saw a gourmet future for the neighborhood.

Today, Wynwood is the place to go for the city's best coffee (Panther), bread (Zak the Baker), and pies (Fireman Derek's), with countless options to imbibe after the workday. Slowly but surely, Miami's arts district is putting as much emphasis on food and drink as it does on graffiti. And there are no signs of slowing. Come February, Brad Kilgore (unquestionably one of the best chefs in Miami) will open Alter in the heart of Wynwood, further developing and educating the area's maturing palate.

In honor of next week's Art Basel and the herds of people that will walk the streets looking to get their grub on, we rounded up the ten best restaurants in Wynwood. (Warning: We took some liberties, allowing restaurants on the perimeter to make this list. Hell, Art Basel has spread, so why can't Wynwood?)

See also: Why Wynwood Is Miami's Best Dining Neighborhood

More »

Richard Ingraham: Chef to the Stars

Categories: Chef Interviews

19-Richard-Ingraham-credit-Stian-Roenning.jpg
Photo by Stian Roenning
"I want to impart some knowledge and hope to our kids," says Richard Ingraham.
In this week's Miami New Times, we profile 30 of the most interesting characters in town, with portraits of each from photographer Stian Roenning. See the entire Miami New Times People Issue here.

Richard Ingraham's first memories are of food. The chef, who was born in Liberty City, recalls his grandmother waking him up at 3 a.m. Thanksgiving Day to help her glaze the hams. "I would help her put on the pineapple rings and the cherries and the cloves," he says.

Ingraham enrolled in the Art Institute of Atlanta to study culinary arts and worked at various restaurants while studying. "When I left, I was already a sous-chef."

More »

Muriel Olivares and Tiffany Noé: Plant People

18-Muriel-Olivares-and-Tiffany-Noe-credit-Stian-Roenning.jpg
Photo by Stian Roenning
Muriel Olivares and Tiffany Noé are exploring everything from helping restaurants open rooftop plots to collaborating on art and landscape projects.
In this week's Miami New Times, we profile 30 of the most interesting characters in town, with portraits of each from photographer Stian Roenning. See the entire Miami New Times People Issue here.

Muriel Olivares and Tiffany Noé stroll through carefully potted rows of herbs, seedlings, and flowers under a stretched plastic roof spider-webbed with PVC pipes attached to sprinklers. Nearby is a sculpted garden space where adult plants grow in shaded, carefully mulched patches.

Four months ago, this small plot a few blocks west of Biscayne Boulevard on NE 76th Street was a weed-choked, abandoned lot. Now it's the latest piece of Olivares and Noé's diverse, expanding Little River Cooperative. It's Miami's most eclectic and exciting venture in urban food cultivation and education.

But don't call Olivares and Noé farmers.

More »

Zak Stern: The Bread Winner

Categories: Interview

4-zak-stern-credit-Stian-Roenning.jpg
Photo by Stian Roenning
Zak Stern is trying to figure out how not to let his runaway success get too far ahead of him.
In this week's Miami New Times, we profile 30 of the most interesting characters in town, with portraits of each from photographer Stian Roenning. See the entire Miami New Times People Issue here.

Three years ago, life was much simpler for Zak Stern. The bearded wunderkind baker did all of his work in a small oven in his garage before eventually moving into a compact Hialeah workspace. Each day as the sun crested the horizon, a few dozen loaves finished developing a deep-auburn crust, and soon the precious packages were en route to a farmers' market.

These days, Stern -- AKA Zak the Baker -- still preps his bread before daybreak, but as he chats at one of the small tables in his namesake whitewashed Wynwood bakery/café, he's accosted by well-wishers and handshakes. An employee whispers in his ear about a restaurant on the phone that wants bread for a recipe it's testing. A boisterous line for avocado toasts and little glass jars of smoked whitefish stretches to the door.

More »

FDA New Rules: Mandatory Calorie Counts on Everything, Even Popcorn and Booze

clubhouseburger.jpg
The FDA is chomping down on food chains.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has just announced new rules that will affect nearly everything we, as diners and consumers, put into our mouths.

That above statement is not hyperbole, by the way. The rules, a major extension of the 2010 law that required chain restaurants to disclose certain nutritional information. Listed under section 4205 of the Affordable Care Act, the mandate got push back from chains, especially movie theaters and pizza chains and the final rules were delayed for three year, according to the New York Times.

More »

This Thanksgiving, Shed Your Shame of Canned Cranberry Sauce

Categories: Holidays, Musings

CranberrySauce.jpg
Photo by Rick Kimpel/WikimediaCommons
Back up off my cranberry sauce.
Sweet-sour cranberry sauce is a Thanksgiving staple. But unlike most dishes that adorn holiday tables, it is highly unpredictable, second only to your aunt's turkey, which for decades has been a coin toss between bone dry and poultry sashimi.

More »

Michelle Bernstein's Seagrape and Crown Room at Thompson Miami Beach Now Open

seagrape_patio.jpg
All photos courtesy of Thompson Miami Beach
Seagrape's patio combines ocean breezes with Michelle Bernstein's cuisine.
The Thompson Miami Beach may have officially opened this past Friday, but its restaurants and bars were closed to the public until yesterday.

Finally, people longing for Michelle Bernstein's cuisine or a Julio Cabrera-designed cocktail can do so with the opening of Seagrape restaurant, the Crown Room bar, and the 1930's House.

See also: Bernstein and Cabrera to Collaborate at Thompson Miami Beach

More »

The Pasta Plant Makes Italian-Inspired, Locally-Sourced Pasta Creations

pasta-plant-1.jpg
Photo by Hannah Sentenac
Italian eateries don't (typically) have much in the way of vegan-friendly fare. Butter, cream, and egg tends to be par for the course, key ingredients in the dishes we love so much.

But it is possible to recreate Italian flavors without any animal products, just ask Melanie Bozzo Perez, co-founder of the Pasta Plant. (Available at Farmer's markets listed on its Twitter feed.) The pastas, sauces, and ready-made meals are handmade, locally-sourced, sustainable, GMO free, unprocessed, organic, and, most importantly, delicious.

See also: Jugofresh Offering Vegan Pies for Thanksgiving

More »

Now Trending

Loading...