Harvey's Smokehouse BBQ: The Right Way to Rub Your Meat!

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Harvey in action.
Harvey's Smokehouse BBQ
www.harveysmokehousebbq.com
20218 Old Cutler Road, Cutler Bay 33189
(305) 233-1227

Harvey Alexander is not your usual southern grill master. Firstly, he's not from the south, even though he opened Harvey's Smokehouse Barbecue way down south in Cutler Bay. He grew up in Delaware. And B, Harvey has got his own style when it comes to barbecuing. It's a style that takes the best from different regions known for their barbecue prowess. "I call it progressive barbecue. I take a little bit from different regions and make it my own."

Whether it's how he marinates his brisket--with the fat side down--or how he rubs his meat (you know what we mean)--first wet rub, then dry rub then smoked--Harvey doesn't follow tradition as much as he builds on it. It's even more apparent in his selection of signature barbecue sauces: Harvey's Original (not to sweet or spicy), Carolina Mustard, Tennessee Spicy Red or KC Style Sweet n' Tangy.

Though Harvey's menu is chock full of southern barbecue staples like baby back and spare ribs, beef brisket, pulled pork, Rib tip, a closer look at the offerings show some cool variations. For instance, Harvey Joe's Big Sloppy is topped with crispy fried onions, while the Blazing BBQ wings are topped with Blue Cheese Crumble. There's also flatbreads, a Chop Chop salad with barbecued chicken and quesadillas with your choice of BBQ pork, chicken or beef. Not exactly your standard southern barbecue menu.

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Rib tip sandwich, with baked beans and slaw.
​If you go to Harvey's, you'd be wise to call ahead with your take out order. It takes some time. "Everything's made to order. Some things come up pretty fast but if we're busy you might have to wait 15 minutes before you food comes out," he admits, but adds that few customers get irritated, or agitated. "They'd rather wait for their order to be made fresh," he says. And judging by his business about a year into his venture, he's right. They cook up about 120 lbs of pork butts (taste better than sounds) and 80 lbs of beef a week. Not really sure but that sounds like a lot of meat.



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