Commission Passes Food Truck Ordinance, What Happens Now?

halesmeeting.jpg
Laine Doss
Dim Ssäm à GoGo and Sakaya Kitchen's Richard Hales spoke on behalf of food trucks at today's commission meeting.
Earlier today, the Miami-Dade Board of County Commissioners passed a new food truck ordinance by a vote of 7-1. It will affect about half the truck gatherings, including those in Kendall, Cutler Bay, and other parts of the county. Roundups in North Miami and Miami -- including Wynwood -- will be unaffected because they are governed by those cities' laws.

The most important restriction: 80 percent of residents within 1,000 feet of a roundup must sign off on an event before it can be held.

County zoning and planning director Marc LaFerrier explained that four or more trucks make a roundup, permitting will take five to seven days, and permits will cost $750 per recurring event -- not per week. In other words, weekly events such as Truckers Out West will pay only once annually as long as no site plan revisions are made.

Once agenda item 5(D) went to the floor, it took 54 minutes of discussion before a vote was taken. Food truck owners Jack Garabedian, Richard Hales, Oren Bass, and David Garcia spoke, as did Andrew Guild from Worth Town Propane, who said the food trucks provide him with additional business. Burger Beast's Sef Gonzalez noted that food truck roundups are family affairs.

Several other food truck owners were present at the meeting, including Jim Heins (Latin Burger), Andrew Kaplan (CheeseMe), Brian Mullins (Ms. Cheezious), Jean Beltran (the Frita Man), Giovanni Fernandez (El Rey de la Paella), and Ramon and Maria Delgado (Grill Master Café).

The commissioners were mainly in favor of the trucks, but had some questions and concerns. Commissioner Rebeca Sosa noted that police were called to a recent roundup because of some heated arguments about traffic. She asked LaFerrier if this would create larger problems and expressed concern over who would verify the signatures of the residents and who would pay for additional police presence.

Other commissioners were on board right away. Commissioner Lynda Bell said this just made good business sense, and Commissioner Barbara Jordan said she would give a favorable vote in exchange for lunch.

Commissioner Sally Heyman recused herself from comment and voting because 
she owns the coffee truck Coffee Brake and did not want to create a conflict of interest.

The amendment passed 7-1, with Commissioner Javier Souto voting "no" because his proposed amendment to require overnight off-street parking for trucks (which had nothing to do with the proposal) was voted down. Souto arrived late to the meeting and appeared to have little understanding of the food trucks.

After the vote, it was time for the food truck operators to digest exactly what this means to their businesses.

Hales, owner of Dim Ssäm a GoGo and Sakaya Kitchen, said, "What are we going to do right now? In the long run, I think this will be good for the truck owners, but the short term is a bit confusing. We can't just stop working while we're waiting for the permitting process to begin." Asked how the amendment might change his business, chef Jeremiah Bullfrog of gastroPod simply said, "Ask us in three months."

Though this ordinance legitimizes the Miami food truck industry, the wording leaves some big questions. Mainly: How long will it take to pull a permit? Will it be possible to obtain the required signatures from residents 1,000 feet from a roundup? Will local cities and neighboring counties adopt similar rules? Food truck roundups will need to re-evolve, with more advance planning and a lot more paperwork.

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31 comments
Amendez497
Amendez497

Why always a problem just leave the trucks alone go where they can and let people go out for a night an enjoy . Why does something always have to be made out of nothing. For gods sake if they are worried about something why don't they worry about the people begging for money and selling things in traffic on every street corner. People who want to go to the food trucks go.So sorry you baby Sotso you didnt get your way so you voted no. Well NO will be my vote for you next time your up.

Sharie A. Blanton
Sharie A. Blanton

What was the last thing that 80% of anybody, left alone Miami agreed to?  I bet 80% of us thing this ordinance is a joke!  What do other cities do? 

Alshouse23
Alshouse23

I FUCKING hate Miami Politicians  they should all rot in hell for being such selfish piece of shits. Oh no somebody came up with a great idea I need to make money from them since my dumb ass can't come up with a great idea

lishuzheng
lishuzheng

..../...../ˉ\........('(...′...′....ˉ~ /').........\.................'../..........\................../............\..............(.......

Google in the input: = ashops.us ==you can find many brand names, even more surprising is that he will sell you the unexpected o(∩_∩)o

Google in the input: = ashops.us ==you can find many brand names, even more surprising is that he will sell you the unexpected o(∩_∩)o

lishuzheng
lishuzheng

..../...../ˉ\........('(...′...′....ˉ~ /').........\.................'../..........\................../............\..............(.......

Google in the input: = ashops.us ==you can find many brand names, even more surprising is that he will sell you the unexpected o(∩_∩)o

Google in the input: = ashops.us ==you can find many brand names, even more surprising is that he will sell you the unexpected o(∩_∩)o

 .......\.............\....

Fern_carrillo
Fern_carrillo

This creates family unity, which is well needed. As long as they pay taxes and are not parked in an area where there are restaurants near by, who are they hurting??

Kirstie Alley's Stomach
Kirstie Alley's Stomach

Can someone provide a coherent translation for this post? What is the end result? Are the trucks being banned from Miami? If so, another reason Miami sucks. I hope the trucks end up in counties that appreciate them. 

Casturdreams
Casturdreams

 The problem is in the editing. I once wrote for a local paper and often had my story edited into an incoherent mess. Too many cooks can spoil the broth...

lourdes
lourdes

I love the food trucks, love the food and the atmosphere at the events and hope they leave them alone, and we can keep enjoying the good creative food. 

disqusdik
disqusdik

 Either this ordinance is stupid or the writer is poor.  All I got out of this is that the county is going to charge people for doing what they've been doing for years for free. Now that I think about it, I guess the writer did the best she could with what she had.

Alfonso Surroca
Alfonso Surroca

Typical local government, greedy bastards doing everything they can to screw over people trying to make an honest buck. Remember when you could buy good, cheap produce on the side of the road just about anywhere in Miami? Until they priced out all the fruit/vegetable stands and replaced all the "u pick" crop lands with condos which now sit vacant. The sad thing is, the food truck scene couldn't be more different just 4 hours to the north in Orlando (I'm glad I moved to Orlando). The larger events are well-organized community events, with police directing traffic, etc. and the smaller events even have the local cities' blessing, setting up at regular weekly intervals on spots such as public parks.

Elodea
Elodea

What is the $750 dollar permit going to provide?  What is the justification of the permit fee?  And although it was probably a "tongue in cheek" comment, shouldn't Commissioner Barbara Jordan be brought up on charges for solicitation of a bribe after suggesting her vote could be bough by a free lunch?

Mobile Cuisine
Mobile Cuisine

 I have to add this. I certainly hope pulling a permit for a food truck is easier than pulling a construction permit. Miami-Dade was one of the few areas of the country where you couldn't set up a lease based on a set period of time. The usual time frame was 6-9 months. *sighs*

Mobile Cuisine
Mobile Cuisine

 80%? Really? Nice way to snub out democracy. You don't even need 80% of the states to ratify a constitutional amendment.

Jwolach
Jwolach

 And Miami Dade County wonders why the economy is in the toilet. They are interfering with people trying to make a living while contributing to the economy and not to mention providing a quality product. This is unbelievable!!!

Susy24
Susy24

Fuck the grammer.  What about the story!  I love Dim Ssam a Gogo.  I don't want them to gogo from Kendall.  =( 

Kelliann McDonald
Kelliann McDonald

LOVE the food trucks. Just not the inflated egos of some of the food truck owners.. who shall remain nameless. 

Also they seem pretty opposed to rules and regulations. Most would rather squat on a property than do the property procedure which is a bit tedious I must say. Happy medium = humble, agreeable food truck owners + relaxed permitting = happy Miami foodies. 

Yak
Yak

 Just another bump in the road to have Miami on the same page as the rest of the country. Keep plugging away Food Trucks. 

Anonymous
Anonymous

 Editing nightmare. "It will make about half of food gatherings including ones in Kendall, Cutler Ridge, and other parts of the county." It will make them WHAT, exactly? With this word missing, I'm left as a reader to try to figure out the main point of the article from the context of the rest, and it's still a little clear. And what on earth does this mean: "his proposed amendment to require food overnight off-street parking for trucks (which had nothing to do with the bill) was voted down"?his proposed amendment to require food overnight off-street parking for trucks (which had nothing to do with the bill) was voted down"?

Proofreader
Proofreader

Laine Doss, you should read this again and make the necessary corrections so it makes sense.

Guest
Guest

Ask the first person who gets sick from the food.

Chuck Strouse
Chuck Strouse

The food trucks are not banned. In unincorporated parts of the county, owners will need to gather signatures from nearby property owners before holding meetups. In cities like Miami and North Miami,nothing will change.

Niva
Niva

 Alfonso, I am getting ready to launch a truck, are you recommending Orlando for any new trucks coming on the scene??

Anonymous
Anonymous

 Okay, I understand what you tried there, by changing the sentence to say it will "effect" those gatherings you list... unfortunately the word you are going for is "AFFECT."

Anonymous
Anonymous

 UNclear rather, ironic of me to point out the editing error and make my own. 

Señor Vega
Señor Vega

indeed, many grammar issues. But this sucks!!!!!! they always trying to tax the lil man. How would you be able to get 80% of residents to agree to this every single week (event).  This is ridiculous!

MiamiResident
MiamiResident

Trucks are inspected by the health department. you're more likely to get sick at a brick and mortar restaurant, than a truck.

Anonymous
Anonymous

 Why couldn't the article just state this in the lede as a straight news article is supposed to?

Again, New Times?
Again, New Times?

Is this Chuck Strouse, the New Times editor?  How many unedited articles do we have to read each week?  Didn't you learn from the Route 9 screw up?  I love the food trucks, but you should be ashamed of this incoherent mess.

miamitrailer1
miamitrailer1

Orlando is a great market ready to explode.  There will definetly be new trucks in the next couple of months.

SusanMiami Trailerwww.miamitrailer.com

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