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Top Ten Cheapest Celebrity Tippers

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5. Jeremy Piven, according to Zimbio, showed up at Nobu in Aspen with a party of 12 -- without a reservation. After being seated and served, Piven reportedly told the manager: "Thanks for nothing," and left a signed Entourage DVD as the tip -- which is at least a bit more generous than an autograph. According to the story, a Nobu employee hurled the box at Piven as he was leaving, and Piven was banned from ever returning to Nobu. Sounds like something Ari Gold, his Entourage character, might do. The alleged act earned Piven the number one "worst tipper" on Zimbio's list of ten worst tippers, number two on thefrisky.com, and at or near the top on most others. We would have placed him higher, but he doesn't make as much money as most folks on this list, and it's just one incident.

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4. LeBron James comes in at number four on thefrisky.com's list, and perhaps for good reason. Seems he once made a Cleveland steak house stay open until 4 in the morning so he could finish his feast. The bill: $800. The tip: $10. Obviously LeBron is waiting to win a championship and use the windfall for tipping.




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3. Barbra Streisand is mentioned again and again for being a cheap tipper as well as a rude and demanding customer. Glamorati says, "Doesn't always tip." Thefrisky.com notes that at a New York restaurant, Babs once "left a $10 tip for a $457 tab." That's not so funny, girl.





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2. Madonna: It's just like the old days: Madonna comes in number one on chart after chart. Glamorati in 2008 named Madonna numero uno in its list of the 34 stingiest celebs. "Doesn't always leave a tip, and when she does it's a cheap one." A year later, List of the Day put her atop its cheapster listing and reported that she and then-husband Guy Ritchie left an $18 tip on a $400 tab (Madonna's worth, incidentally, is estimated to be in the hundreds of millions). Madge is also the cover girl for bad tippers at thefrisky.com, nabbed the number five spot on zimbio.com's list of worst tippers, and also appears on LoveToKnow's survey as well.

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1. Tiger Woods came in number four on Zimbio's scrooge compilation and was cited on every single list. The reason he doesn't tip: The man worth more than $500 million says it's because he never carries cash. The Frisky reports Tiger dated "a gal in Las Vegas who had to tip for him whenever they went out." And according to List of the Day, Tiger once "pulled a mulligan on a $5 tip, repocketing the money meant for a waitress after realizing he had tipped her earlier in the evening. He was possibly distracted by the $10,000 hand of blackjack he was playing." Hey, Tiger, we have a tip for you: When it comes to leaving money for those who are serving you, just do it.

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500 comments
CovertHarris
CovertHarris

Rather than promoting breaking the law, I just leave enough over 20% to pay the recipient's taxes.

commonsensewoman
commonsensewoman


A friend who runs a golf tournament that he has played in several times says he's the worst guy she's ever run across - rude, arrogant, demanding and never tips any of the staff and they just plain don't like him!!!!   That was 10-11 years ago and he hasn't changed.   I always thought he was FULL of himself and it came as no surprise about his character in other areas as well! 

roldan52
roldan52

Cheapskates make me sick. My father raised 6 children on the tips he made and he worked hard to get them . I guess that is why I overtip. I like to thank them for good service and maybe help them out.

Trogdorish
Trogdorish

20% minimum, the server ends up losing up to 30% of that in "Tip Share" for bussers, bartenders, and hostesses.

It isn't "Entitled", it's "My Job" and "Your understood obligation"

pruitt.lisa.l.p
pruitt.lisa.l.p

It's 15 % if the service is good and 20 % if it's great

Tiredoftipping
Tiredoftipping

When did tipping go from 15% to 20%? Food prices have gone up so the amount the servers are receiving automatically goes up.

whatareyoun2
whatareyoun2

I waited tables for a few years and believe me, it wasn't easy. These folks work hard and depend on your generosity. Try living on $2.13 an hour plus tipping out your bus boys and bartenders - and then every dollar you sell in food & bevvies is reported to Uncle Sammy. By the time you get turned upside down and shaken down and avg that in with slow shifts - you're lucky if you net an avg of over $5 per hour worked. 


One of the places I used to work at - if a table of "minorities" came in - none of the servers would want to take the table (including the waitstaff who were themselves "minorities" of that same race). The servers would actually fight over who would HAVE to wait on them for free (80% of the time). Keeping in mind the tip-outs to everyone and the % you have to declare to uncle sammy. Best thing you can do is pay for your meal with a credit card, but tip in CASH. If your tip is on the credit card, the entire amount is reported to uncle sammy. However, if the credit card slip has zero tip - the server can claim a bit less - cuz who's to say they weren't stiffed by the cheap folks that paid with a credit card? NEVER NEVER NEVER leave a tip on your credit card TO ANYONE THAT DEPENDS ON TIPS FOR A LIVING - unless you want their greedy uncle getting a big chunk of it.

BBart
BBart

Rule of Thumb (for me):  For breakfast, tip by the hour ($10 per hour).  Breakfast food is inexpensive, and servers need to turn tables over repeatedly to make it work.  If I'm there for 1-2 hours and our total bill is $15, I leave an extra $10 or $20 depending on time spent.  


For lunch... pretty standard 20% (and I don't tip on tax, sorry... pet peeve), though the above rule applies if we're at a place that needs to turn the table over a lot.


Dinner... 20% on food, 10% on big wine ($150+ per bottle), plus extra if we really got great service / attention.


I do like the policy of NO TIPPING... restauranteur raises prices sufficiently to cover paying his people more, and then devising a "PROFIT SHARING" model based on gross sales.  Work hard, dress/look/smell appropriately, and be nice... good things happen.

tommydkat
tommydkat

I used to be a waiter, so I know the plight of relying so heavily on the public to pay you.  Having been in Europe for a year or so just changed my whole perspective on things.  Tipping there (and most if not all countries aside from the US) is something that is a little extra.  Shame on the employers for not making waiting on jobs a decent living.  I actually had a waiter insist that I take some money back (he knew I was American, and that I was over tipping.)  he said he appreciates it, but the restaurant pays him a great salary with to take care of the guests.

As far as celebrities being cheap, just because they make a crap load of money, does not mean it should be expected that they pay more for good service. 20 - 25 percent.. Sure, but don't expect them to give you a tip that will pay your mortgage.

gvern100
gvern100

Snoop Dogg is cheap as well. I took a room service order to his room for his entourage and our restaurant doesn't even do room service and he stiffed me.

shinjots
shinjots

Good Lord you people are a bunch of self entitled whiny brats. How rich or poor someone is, is none of your business. How much of a gift they leave you at the end if their meal is also not something that you can dictate. I waited tables before and it's NOT DIFFICULT. Want more money...talk to the boss. He/she is charging me plenty for my meal so take it up with them.

valetguy
valetguy

The Duck Dynasty crew are the worst I have ever seen. We brought in there bags (4 carts full) and parked 11 suburbans for them and what did they give us, NOTHING not even a thanks. When they returned with there vehicles they would throw there keys to the valet and just say here ya go. Worst in my book period.

pstroma8
pstroma8

in regards to generous celebrity tippers , add howard stern, he leaves no less than 50%.. i e been a server for 20 years in hollywood/beverly hills and private exclusive lounges , have to say that with exception of obama pretty much all political figures are cheap bastards as well as religious folks of all kinds

tennboy1981
tennboy1981

I seriously can't believe the comments some of these people have left.  Its so pitiful how greedy and spoiled Americans are.  Look, its simple....Most servers make roughly 2.13 per hour....the federal minimum wage for servers......Most of them also have to tip out their bartenders, food runners, and table bussers which all affects their bottom line at the end of the night.  When you are too cheap to tip appropriately, you are basically stealing from the server, since they still have to tip out the others.....I hear people saying "well if I order a 10.00 burger or a 30.00 steak I should be able to tip the same for the same amount of work".....That being said, rethink what I just said, servers have a lot of overhead and dont make much in an hourly wage...they depend on their tips.  If everyone in the restaurant tipped the server a dollar becuase they all got the same service, guess what?  The server would be broke and most likely not working there....If you can afford to splurge on a 30.00 entree, versus spending 10 dollars on the cheeseburger special, you can afford to tip your server appropriately.  I would never expect any celebrities to tip "more" than 20%, but if you can go out and spend 2 grand on a nice expensive dinner, and boast to your friends how "rich" you are, you sure as hell can tip your server appropriately, since they are the ones making your evening HAPPEN.  Its easy.  If you can afford to tip your server, then DONT GO OUT....cook your own steak, or go to Mcdonalds where you dont have to tip.

nrubino5
nrubino5

It's always those that have the most that give the least !!!!!!!

penelfunk
penelfunk

I just ran across this site, some good comments. I'm not sure but aren't wait staff in CA taxed on their yearly sales?So if a waitperson say has a, 200$ tab, the IRS assumes that he or she has received an appropriate tip, and then is taxed upon that assumption. So in theory it could actually end up costing the wait person more(out of that persons own pocket!?) to wait upon the "cheap"and famous. I'm just curious because if they are being taxed for total yearly sales, then things like orders to go, or getting stiffed on a tip come back to bite them in the ass more than once. Just curious if anyone knows more about this?

fashogi
fashogi

Isn't tip already included in large groups? Thats an additional tip and its not necessary at all to do that

 

brody182
brody182

why are we supporting these trash so called celebrities?

Billy Williams
Billy Williams

Oops, forgot to add that comment was from another article on celebrity tippers, i agree with it, where's the proof?

Jroc178
Jroc178

Combat tours from.Vietnam to Iraq? If you're going to be a lying piece of $hit..at least make it somewhat believable? Idiot.

Pete
Pete

One more stereotype: I'll wait on gays and lesbians any time. They are notoriously GREAT tippers.

Pete
Pete

I think anybody in the food service industry knows that blacks are notoriously bad tippers, so the celebs referenced in the article come as no surprise! (Even Oprah said she's embarrassed by what bad tippers "her people" are.) FYI: I've also received terrific tips from black diners, but that is an infrequent occurrence.

Joanne Bishop
Joanne Bishop

Big surprise? Those that made it, don't want to share it? Big as their butt's, their Ego's. Always have a lot of advice on how to get there but not willing to help other's along the way.

Allen
Allen

  I know this is long and detailed but it clearly spells out the law in California regarding tips and service charges, the latter of which are referred to as "autograts."  As you can see per Question 6, a service charge (autograt) is not a tip. California Labor Code Section 351 prohibits employers and their agents from sharing in or keeping any portion of a gratuity left for or given to one or more employees by a patron. Furthermore it is illegal for employers to make wage deductions from gratuities, or from using gratuities as direct or indirect credits against an employee’s wages. The law further states that gratuities are the sole property of the employee or employees to whom they are given. "Gratuity" is defined in the Labor Code as a tip, gratuity, or money that has been paid or given to or left for an employee by a patron of a business over and above the actual amount due for services rendered or for goods, food, drink, articles sold or served to patrons. It also includes any amount paid directly by a patron to a dancer covered by IWC Wage Order 5 or 10. 1.Q.What is a tip? A.A tip is money a customer leaves for an employee over the amount due for the goods sold or services rendered. Tips belong to the employee, not to the employer. 2.Q.When a customer pays their bill with a credit card and the payment includes a tip, when can the employee expect to receive the money from the employer? A.Payment of a gratuity made by a patron using a credit card must be paid to the employee not later than the next regular payday following the date the patron authorized the credit card payment. Labor Code Section 351 3.Q.My employer is deducting the credit card processing fees from my tips. Is this legal? A.No. Labor Code Section 351 provides that the employer must pay the employee the full amount of the tip that is indicated on the credit card. The employer may not make any deduction for credit card processing fees or costs that are charged to the employer by the credit card company from gratuities paid to the employee. 4.Q.I work in a large restaurant as a waiter. My employer told me that I am required to share my tips with the busboy and the bartender. Am I obligated to do this? A. Yes. According to a California court, Labor Code Section 351 allows involuntary tip pooling. Therefore, your employer can require that you share your tips with other staff that provide service in the restaurant. In this regard, it’s DLSE’s position that when a tip pooling arrangement is in effect, the tips are to be distributed among the employees who provide "direct table service." Such employees could conceivably include waiters and waitresses, busboys, bartenders, host/hostesses and maitre d’s. Employees who do not provide direct table service and who do not share in the tip pool include dishwashers, cooks, and chefs, except in restaurants where the chefs prepare the food at the patron’s table, in which case the chef may participate in the tip pool. Additionally, tip pooling cannot be used to compensate the owner(s), manager(s), or supervisor(s) of the business, even if these individuals should provide direct table service to a patron. 5.Q.Are the tips I receive considered part of my "regular rate of pay" for overtime calculations? A.No. Since tips are voluntarily left for you by the customer of the business and are not being provided by the employer, they are not considered as part of your regular rate of pay when calculating overtime. 6.Q.Is a mandatory service charge considered to be the same as a tip or gratuity? A.No, a tip is a voluntary amount left by a patron for an employee. A mandatory service charge is an amount that a patron is required to pay based on a contractual agreement or a specified required service amount listed on the menu of an establishment. An example of a mandatory service charge that is a contractual agreement would be a 10 or 15 percent charge added to the cost of a banquet. Such charges are considered as amounts owed by the patron to the establishment and are not gratuities voluntarily left for the employees. Therefore, when an employer distributes all or part of a service charge to its employees, the distribution may be at the discretion of the employer and the service charge, which would be in the nature of a bonus, would be included in the regular rate of pay when calculating overtime payments. 7.Q.My employer deducts my tips from my paycheck. Is this legal? A.No. Your employer can neither take your tips (or any part of them), nor deduct money from your wages because of the tips you earn. Furthermore, your employer cannot credit your tips against the money the employer owes you. Labor Code Section 351 8.Q.My employer pays me less than the minimum wage because he includes my tips in my hourly pay. Is this legal? A.No. Unlike under federal regulations, in California an employer cannot use an employee’s tips as a credit towards its obligation to pay the minimum wage. California law requires that employees receive the minimum wage plus any tips left for them by patrons of the employer’s business. Labor Code Section 351 9.Q.What can I do if my employer credits my tips against my wages? A.You can either file a wage claim with the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (the Labor Commissioner’s Office), or you can file a lawsuit in court against your employer in to recover the lost wages.  Additionally, if your employer is crediting your tips against your wages, you are being underpaid your wages and thus, if you no longer work for this employer, you can make a claim for the waiting time penalty. 10.Q.What is the procedure that is followed after I file a wage claim? A.After your claim is completed and filed with a local office of the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement (DLSE), it will be assigned to a Deputy Labor Commissioner who will determine, based upon the circumstances of the claim and information presented, how best to proceed. Initial action taken regarding the claim can be (i) referral to a conference, (ii) referral to a hearing, or (iii) dismissal of the claim. If the decision is to hold a conference, the parties will be notified by mail of the date, time and place of the conference. The purpose of the conference is to determine the validity of the claim, and to see if the claim can be resolved without a hearing. If the claim is not resolved at the conference, the next step usually is to refer the matter to a hearing or dismiss it for lack of evidence. At the hearing the parties and witnesses testify under oath, and the proceeding is recorded. After the hearing, an Order, Decision, or Award (ODA) of the Labor Commissioner will be served on the parties. Either party may appeal the ODA to a civil

Lds555
Lds555

maybe if they had ever had to work hard in their lives they would appreciate how hard it is to be a good waiter/waitress.  Shame on them.  my opionion of them has drastically changed.

Donny
Donny

TIger doesn't tip, because he doesn't carry cash?  B.S.!!!  Hey Tiger, can't you tip when you sign the credit card slip!!!!

Man
Man

Ha! How funny is it that black people are disproportionately represented in this list. It really confirms the stereotype!

Tracy
Tracy

WOW, so many cheap  asses in this thread! I'm on a fixed income (disability due to MS) and I go out to dinner as a rare treat. I know beforehand I'll be adding at least 20% no matter what. I understand the value of a dollar and the value of hard work. I am consistently generous to servers, have never been in the service industry because I would choke a bitch within 20 seconds and go to jail. The work they do would drive anyone batshit so based on that alone, I tip them well for having to deal with horrid people. I know when I go out, my server can at least go home at the end of the shift knowing one person was kind and understanding.

pruitt.lisa.l.p
pruitt.lisa.l.p

It's 15 % if it's good service and 20 % if it's great

commonsensewoman
commonsensewoman

@whatareyoun2  What you said is true... they aren't all like that but the far too many are.  I've seen it first hand in more than one place. 

kykingdom
kykingdom

@whatareyoun2  I'm sorry, but this post just pisses me off.  I also waited tables for several years, at $2.13/hr., depending on people's generosity to pay for my school, rent and utility bills and I did so just fine without having to resort to risking jail time or fines at the very least for tax evasion.  Granted so many people in this country are paid "under the table," for example, I doubt the 12-year-old boy that's mowing yards around the neighborhood is going to be filing a tax return this year, but that doesn't mean you should demand a tip be paid to you in cash just so you can avoid reporting it to the government.  If you are seriously that strapped for cash at the end of the day, you need to either re-evaluate your expenses or your career choice (or simply claim more exemptions on your W4 to decrease your withholdings), not your ability to avoid your "uncle sammy" seeing what you made and taking your money.  It never fails that the people that avoid paying taxes are always the first to complain about that pothole that threw their car out of alignment when unfortunately, there just wasn't money in the budget to fix it immediately because of lack of funding from the people avoiding paying taxes.  It all comes full circle.


Also, if you are averaging somewhere in the range of $5 per hour worked, then your employer is REQUIRED by law to make up the difference so that you are at least paid minimum wage if the money you earn from tips do not provide that during the pay period worked.  Unfortunately, few servers know this because they don't know the laws they are trying to avoid, just that they should avoid them because their friend told them to.  I will say that waiting tables can be a very unstable source of income.  I worked at a very, middle of the road steakhouse that was at the low end as far as cost of the meals served, $8-18 per entrée and I still earned anywhere between $10-24/hr total (wages+tips) when I was working, even with all the crappy or non-tippers and working the non-peak hours.  Pay your taxes, like everyone else.

Jaybee
Jaybee

@whatareyoun2 pay your taxes like we do. The other end of this is how many makes big tips but never pay taxes on it.

krumley7
krumley7

You can't afford a "$150+ bottle of wine" if you can't tip 20% to pay for the service provided to you. (i.e. your server presenting the bottle, opening it for you, allowing you to taste incase you don't enjoy it, pouring it for you seemlessly throughout your meal so your glass is never empty--possibly helping you pair your wine with your meal, and/or recommending a new wine for you to try if you're feeling like trying something new.) Servers invest extensive time and money into educating themselves on this matter so their guests can receive the best experience possible. Don't be that asshole. Tip accordingly.

Ivapaint
Ivapaint

@tommydkat Yup; we went to Iceland and were pleasantly surprised to have our tips turned down with the explanation that tipping is considered somewhat rude as their work ethic dictates that they provide the best service possible, which indeed they do.  Even one of the tour bus drivers was offended (but trying to be cool about it) when some loud, obnoxious woman passed the hat around the bus asking people for their spare change so that the driver could "have some beers on us."  We could tell he was mortified.  Refreshing, to say the least.  I suppose folks in the service industry are either paid adequately or have a more developed sense of pride in their work than here in the U.S.

bartender101
bartender101

I don't know if it's the same where you are. But I have lived in SC GA and TN. That being said no matter what the price is on the food or if they decide to go up I still was paid 2.13 an hour. I know I am very good at what I do and I work hard for the money I recieve. With 2.13 an hour and work 80 hours plus for two weeks my check comes out to be anywhere from 17 to 32 dollars. 18% as a tip isn't much. In fact if you have a party most restaurants automatically add 18% gratuity in on the bills. So let's say you come in with your family order a basic meal and a soda or even water that gets refills for free. No alcohol. You sit and chit chat with your family for three hours. Your bill as a whole isn't that much therefore the gratuity isn't either. But nobody leaves a tip on top of the gratuity. For instance let's say your family has ten adults. Your bill as a whole is $200. The gratuity would be $36. And you sat for 3 hours getting free refills "camping"on one servers table. Let's split the bill evenly between 10 people. $20 a person no big deal right?? With a gratuity in each check $3.60. Why not throw at least $2 on each check from each adult. $20 extra from a party. That's not only generous but makes up for the tables and money lost from a party that's been sitting. Think of it like this your party takes up 3 tables that sit 4 a piece for three hours. She could have had 12 tables averaging at 4 tables an hour for 3 hours. Let's say they tipped her $5 a table. That comes out to be $60 in 3 hours. Now let's go back to your party of a gratuity with no additional tip she makes $36 losing money. The service industry lives off their tips. A check is anything isn't even a tank of gas. If you're going to be cheap go to a dollar menu or stay home.

BBart
BBart

@valetguy Their, There, They're


Their cars, their money, their food.


Park the car over THERE!  There are the folks from Duck Dynasty.


They're nice people.  They're not big tippers, apparently.



Jaybee
Jaybee

@tennboy1981 10.00 tip for any more is more than plenty. Look how many tables they serve. 10 tables an hours is 100.00 an hour. More than I get paid. If I decide to swing a high price meal, that does not mean I should feel guilty I have more to spend than others.

shinjots
shinjots

Talk about being spoiled,yeesh. Servers are not entitled to anything except what their employer pays them, period end of story. Anything they get from the customer is a "gratuity", for exceptional service, not a requirement. So please don't tell the rest of us that unless we're willing to pay you what you "think" you "deserve" that we need to stay home. Here's a better idea, don't like what your boss is paying you, then DON'T GO OUT. Stay home.

green.897
green.897

@penelfunk I don't know about CA, but in OH this isn't the case. However many restaurants require a server to turn over a percentage of their sales to support staff. This means that - yes - a person who runs up a large tab and leaves little to no tip can in essence be leaving a "negative tip". 

Yes, I realize this isn't the fault of the customer, but it's a reality of the industry. If you don't want to buy into the industry, then get your food  to-go.

Fools_RushL_in
Fools_RushL_in

@penelfunk Absolutely. Restaurants are erratic about reporting tips but normally they report no less than 15%, whether collected or not, or risk the wrath of the IRS.

cynthiarose1917
cynthiarose1917

ITS SPELLED, BLACKS. A DUMB STATEMENT, FOR A DUMB INDIVIDUAL. VERY SAD.

Jaybee
Jaybee

@Pete Why? Because they are happy happy happy?


shinjots
shinjots

Take order, enter order, carry order from point A to point B...very difficult indeed. Yeah, I was a waiter once and it's not at all difficult. Want more money, talk to your boss.

cowlman131313
cowlman131313

@Lds555 you my friend are slightly delirious if you believe it takes no work to be a professional athlete. 

tennboy1981
tennboy1981

@Donny He's just too worried about the next affair he can have, I guess he forgot how to tip.

Jaybee
Jaybee

@Tracy Tip IF they they are a good sever, not just because they brought you food. There is a difference.


CovertHarris
CovertHarris

@kykingdom 


I leave enough over 20% to make up for taxes the recipient should pay. I don't advocate breaking the law.

green.897
green.897

@Jaybee @tennboy1981 10 tables an hour is almost unheard-of,and if it happened, it would happen rarely and perhaps only during the busiest hour or two of the busiest day of the week.


You sound like you have no idea what you're talking about.

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